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  1. #26
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    Re: Negro League photos

    George--#1PaFan--I'm having some password issues in the other forum, so I'm having problems posting. Crazy stuff like that happens if you just change your password.

    Here's a few more:



    Detroit Stars hat



    New York Black Yankees hat



    Indianapolis ABCs hat



    Chicago American Giants hat



    1929, features Negro League all-star and Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Wells. . At the time this card was issued, Wells was a young shortstop playing for the St. Louis Stars of the Negro League. Wells led the league in hitting in 1929, batting .400, and again in 1930, averaging .409. The card identifies Wells along the base as "W. Wells" and also gives his position ("Short Stop") in white lettering.



    Indianapolis Clowns hat



    Homestead Grays hat



    The 1935 Pittsburgh Crawfords



    Pittsburgh Crawfords hat
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  2. #27
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    Re: Negro League photos

    A few more:



    Brooklyn Royal Giants hat



    Hilldale Daisies logo



    Baltimore Elite Giants hat



    St. Louis Stars hat autographed by Ted "Double Duty" Radcliffe



    New York Lincoln Giants, 1911 from their inaugural season. The Lincoln Giants were one of early Negro League baseball's greatest and most legendary teams. This club is credited with a 108-12 record in 1911, winning the first of three straight eastern championships. "Copyright 1911 by C. Mason Photo, N.Y." in the lower left. This team was managed by Sol White (center), and includes HOFer John Henry "Pop" Lloyd, (.475 average in 1911), Dick "Cannonball" Redding, Spot Poles, Louis Santop, Grant "Home Run" Johnson, and Dan McClellan (who threw the first perfect game in black baseball history for the 1903 Cuban X Giants). Half of this roster came from two other noted early teams, the 1903-04 Cuban X Giants and the 1905-06 Philadelphia Giants



    Cleveland Buckeyes hat



    Birmingham Black Barons hat



    Kansas City Monarchs hat

    Article: Harry "The Hat" Walker (1916-1999)



    Effa Manley, the most influential woman in black baseball



    Effa Manley, with her husband,
    Abe, received money after her
    Negro League stars defected to
    the Major Leagues


    The first lady of black baseball
    Manley was an innovator in the Negro Leagues






    Atlanta Black Crackers hat



    Baltimore Black Sox hat



    Cuban Stars hat
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  3. #28
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    Re: Negro League photos



    Philadelphia Stars hat



    Newark Eagles hat



    Nashville Elite Giants logo



    1943 Broadside. The Zulu Cannibal Giants were formed in 1938, a concept inspired by the war in Ethiopia. Hoping to draw a white fan following, the team would get into role while playing in grass skirts, painted faces, and even bare feet. This team was home to some of the best talent in the Negro League, among them the likes of Howard Easterling and Buck O’Neil.

    http://www.nlbpa.com/27june2005.html
    27 June 2005
    President Bush promotes T-ball
    STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
    President Bush and two dozen kids from inner-city teams kicked off the fifth season of White House T-ball Sunday (2/26/2005) on the South Lawn.

    The president performed the equivalent of throwing out the first pitch when he leaned over, placed a ball on the tee at home plate and shouted, "Play ball!"

    The one-inning game set the Jackie Robinson South Ward Little League Black Yankees of Newark, N.J., against the South Side Little League Memphis Red Sox from Chicago. The teams are named after Negro League teams of the early 1900s and are part of the Little League Urban Initiative, an effort to get urban youth to take up baseball.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  4. #29
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    Re: Negro League photos

    R-I-P

    http://espn.go.com/classic/obit/s/20...1/2131415.html
    Thursday, August 11, 2005
    "Double Duty" Radcliffe dies at 103
    ESPN.com news services
    CHICAGO -- Theodore Roosevelt "Double Duty" Radcliffe, a former Negro League star thought to be the oldest professional baseball player, died Thursday of complications from a long battle with cancer. He was 103.

    Ted Radcliffe grew up in Mobile, Ala. as one of 10 children. As a teen in 1919, he and his brother, Alex, also a baseball player, hitchhiked to Chicago. A year later, Ted signed with the semi-pro Illinois Giants for $100 a month. The rest of his family soon followed and settled in Chicago. He formally entered the Negro National League in 1928.

    He was given the nickname "Double Duty" by sports writer Damon Runyon in the 1932 Negro League World Series, when Radcliffe played both games of a double-header for the Pittsburgh Crawfords. In the first game, he caught a Satchel Paige shutout; in the second, Radcliffe pitched a shutout of his own. Runyon wrote that Radcliffe "was worth the price of two admissions."

    "Double Duty shared such a love for baseball and a passion for life," said White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf. "We all loved to see him at the ballpark, listen to his stories and share in his laughter. He leaves such a great legacy after experiencing so much history and change during his long life. He will be missed by all of us with the White Sox."
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  5. #30
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    Re: Negro League photos



    1945



    Ben Taylor



    Ticket to the 1947 Negro World Series between the New York Cubans and Cleveland Buckeyes:

    You can see it cost two dollars. Boy, have times changed!



    Alejandro Crespo:

    Crespo was an infielder who played on and off for the Cuban Stars of the Eastern Colored League (and the independent clubs) from 1918 to 1933. In he also played for the Gilkerson Union Giants and barnstormed..

    Crespo is considered as one of the better players to play in the Cuban professional baseball league and is a member of the Mexican Baseball Hall of Fame.



    John Donaldson:

    John was precise pitcher with nasty curve ball. He was one of the greatest left-handed Negro League pitchers. John Henry Lloyd considered him as the toughest pitcher that he ever faced. John’s career spanned 22 years.



    Jud "Boojum" Wilson:

    Jud’s career spanned from 1922 to 1945. He played all infield positions, and even played some outfield and managed.

    Wilson was feared as a hitter and was known for his willingness to fight, any time, anywhere. In John Holway's Blackball Stars, Wilson's best friend, Jake Stephens, claimed, "The minute he saw an umpire, he became a maniac." A story in which Jud broke up a knife fight in the showers is also recounted. Several versions of a tale involving Wilson dangling Stephens out of a window by the ankles many stories about the sidewalk have made their way down through the years.

    Jud got his nickname "Boojum" because that was the noise his line drives made when they hit the outfield walls. Satchel Paige claimed that Jud and Chino Smith were the two toughest outs he ever faced.

    While records are sketchy, Wilson had one of the best batting averages in the Negro Leagues, and he also hit for power. His lifetime statistics in the Negro Leagues show a batting average of .345.

    Wilson was one of the best hitters in baseball history. He led the league in hitting with a .373 average in the 1923 season, and went on to post a lifetime average in the Negro Leagues of .345. Wilson also recorded the highest lifetime average in the Cuban Winter Leagues, .372 for six seasons, including batting titles of .403 in '25-'26 and .441 in '27-8 playing for Havana.

    Wilson was a star on four championship teams in a six year period between 1929 and 1934 (the '29 Baltimore Black Sox, the '31 Homestead Grays, the '32 Crawfords, and the '34 Phila Stars.) Satchel Paige considered him one to be one of the top two hitters he ever faced in the Negro Leagues (which is not surprising as Wilson hit .375 lifetime against Paige.)

    In the photo at the right, Jud Wilson is in his Baltimore Black Sox uniform in 1923, the first year of the Eastern Colored League. This photo originates from the archives of the Baltimore Afro-American.



    Judy Johnson



    Josh Gibson.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  6. #31

    Re: Negro League photos

    great pictures!
    In MO I Trust

  7. #32
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Thanks, glad you like them.

    I'll likely post a few more this weekend.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  8. #33
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    Re: Negro League photos

    I'm a sucker for great baseball nicknames. It just seems they aren't as good as they used to be. And "Cool Papa" Bell has to be near the top of my favorites.

  9. #34
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Sultans of Swing
    I'm a sucker for great baseball nicknames. It just seems they aren't as good as they used to be. And "Cool Papa" Bell has to be near the top of my favorites.
    Glad you liked these. I hadn't ever posted anything here about the Negro Leagues, so it was an especial honor to post these.

    I failed on my promise to post more, but I've already added everything that the Brooklyn Dodger fan sent.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  10. #35
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Just a few more goodies that I've been updated with:

    Spottswood Poles:



    Born: Nov. 7, 1889
    Died: Sept. 12, 1962

    Spottswood Poles, called the black Ty Cobb, won five battle stars and a purple heart in World War I with the 369th Infantry (Harlem Hell Fighters) while attached to the French Army.

    He broke into professional black baseball as the center fielder and lead off hitter for the powerful 1909 Philadelphia Giants. He moved on the New York Lincoln Giants in 1911, where he batted .440 for the season and stole 41 bases in only 60 games. He hit .398 in 1912, .414 in 1913, and .487 in 1914.

    With the Lincoln club in the 10 game 1915 black championship, Poles batted only .205, but because of his speed and base running ability scored 11 runs. In a 15 year Negro League career, Poles is credited with a .400 lifetime batting average and a .319 average for the four winter seasons he spent in Cuba. He is also credited with a .610 batting average in exhibition games against major league competition, many of which took place while Poles was in Cuba.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Jimmie Crutchfield:



    The 5'7" 150-lb righthanded-hitting Crutchfield was an excellent bat-handler, a fast runner, and a reliable outfielder.

    He batted .286 his rookie year for the 1930 Birmingham Black Barons, and in 1931 he moved to the Indianapolis ABC's and batted .330, believed to be his career high.

    When the financially troubled ABC's were unable to pay most of their players, Crutchfield jumped to the Pittsburgh Crawfords, with whom he stayed for five years, making the squad for the East-West all-star game three times.

    He played for the Newark Eagles in 1937and Crutchfield made the all-star team in 1941 as a member of the Chicago American Giants.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Quincy Trouppe:



    Trouppe was an all-star Negro League catcher who also performed in the Mexican League, Canadian Provincial League, and for the crack semi-pro Bismarck, ND club.

    He played 14 winters in Latin America and barnstormed with black all-star teams playing white major leaguers. In the twilight of his career, he appeared in 6 games for the 1952 Cleveland Indians and 84 games for their Triple-A farm club.

    A lifetime .300 hitter, he batted as high as .352 for Chicago in the 1948 Negro American League. He started for the West in five all-star games, four as a catcher in 1945-48.

    He managed the Cleveland Buckeyes to NAL titles in 1945 and 1947. He was also a nationally recognized amateur boxer who won a major heavyweight tournament title in 1936
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Willard Brown:



    WILLARD BROWN

    In July 1947 the St. Louis Browns were the worst team in major league baseball. In hopes of improving their fortunes, the Browns purchased the contracts of Henry Thompson and Willard Brown from the Negro League Kansas City Monarchs. The St. Louis Gazette-Democrat called the move "an eyebrow-lifting experiment." Thompson and Brown became the first black teammates in the major leagues. The move provoked a mixed response in a city many considered part of the South.

    Brown, 36 at the time, lasted 21 games with the St. Louis Browns and was released after batting .179. He became the first black American Leaguer to hit a home run during his short stay with the last-place team. He returned to the Negro League and batted .374 with 18 homers in 1948 and .317 in 1949, ending his Negro League career with a .355 batting average.

    Willard Brown had already spent a legendary career as one of the best players in the Negro Leagues. A powerful and fast slugger with a 40-ounce bat, Brown had grown up in Shreveport, Louisiana and had once been the Monarchs' spring training bat boy. He played his first games for the Monarchs in 1935.

    Willard Brown let his bat speak for him in the winter following his release from the Browns. In the Puerto Rican Winter League, Brown hit 27 home runs while winning the league's Triple Crown. He won the Negro American League batting title in 1951 with a .417 average. In 22 years of professional baseball, Willard Brown hit for a combined average of .305 including .352 in the Negro Leagues. He is often considered the best home run hitter not included in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Rickwood Field:



    This is the oldest baseball park in America. Rickwood Field was the passionate pursuit of a young Birmingham industrialist, Rick Woodward.

    Woodward soon opened Rickwood Field up to another Birmingham team: the Birmingham Black Barons. African-American baseball fans could now go to Rickwood and watch "their" own team play at home, in a prestigious ballpark famous throughout the baseball leagues.

    Woodward allowed the Black Barons to play every other week at Rickwood; the white Barons team would play on the alternating week.

    Despite the inclusion of the Black Barons, race relations were not rosy at Rickwood. Black fans were allowed to attend white Barons' games, but could not sit with white fans. African-American fans sat in a separate set of stands behind the outer right field wall.

    Every other Sunday, though, the roles reversed. When the Black Barons played, the African-American fans flooded the park. Black fans filled the park; they sometimes had to set up extra bleachers on the grass inside the outfield walls just to accompany all of the fans. Any white fans who showed up to watch the great baseball being played by the Black Barons and their opponents found themselves sitting in the separate set of bleachers past right field, just where African-American fans had to sit during Barons' games.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    Baseball from the Negro Leagues East-West all-star game of 1937. Buck Leonard, first baseman for the Homestead Grays, hit a home run to help the East win, 7-2, and kept this baseball as a souvenir of the game.

    In 1947, when racial integration of major-league baseball effectively ended the need for the Negro Leagues, this baseball became a piece of history. Leonard, who was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972, saved this ball for nearly forty-five years before finally donating it to the Smithsonian in 1981.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Jose Mendez (also known as "The Black Diamond"):



    Negro League teams played for: Brooklyn Royal Giants (1908), Cuban Stars (1909-12), All Nations (1912-17), Chicago American Giants (1918), Detroit Stars (1919), Kansas City Monarchs (1920-26)

    Positions: Pitcher, Shortstop, Second Baseman, Third Baseman, Outfielder, Manager HEIGHT: 5’8" WEIGHT: 155 lbs.

    José Méndez was perhaps the first Latino baseball legend ever. In his homeland of Cuba, they called him "El Diamante Negro," The Black Diamond.

    Barred from the major leagues because of his dark skin, The Black Diamond nonetheless sparkled in Cuban baseball and the Negro Leagues in the United States. During the first quarter of the 20th century, there was no better pitcher. That was the opinion of many, including the great major league manager John McGraw. .It was in Cuba that El Diamante Negro regularly beat the greatest major league pitchers in exhibition games. Sometimes, when Méndez walked into restaurants in Cuba, people stood up and clapped.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Ray Brown:



    Ray Brown played for Cum Posey's Homestead Grays from 1932-45 and married Posey's daughter before moving on to Mexico (1946-49) and the Canadian Provincial League (1950-53).

    He started the 1935 East-West all-star game, threw a no-hitter for Santa Clara (Cuban Winter League) in 1936, and pitched them to the 1938 Cuban crown. He was 9-3 for the 1944 Black World Champion Homestead Grays, and threw a one-hit shutout in the World Series.

    In 1945, he had a seven-inning perfect game for the Grays. He helped Sherbrooke to the 1951 Provincial title with an 11-10 record and a 3.31 ERA.

    A good batter who switch-hit at times, he often played the outfield and pinch hit. He was one of five players mentioned as being of major league caliber in a 1938 wire sent to the Pittsburgh Pirates by The Pittsburgh Courier. The other four were Hall of Famers Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard, Cool Papa Bell, and Satchel Paige.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Alex Pompez:



    Alejandro ‘Alex’ Pompez, a black Cuban American who owned the New York Cubans for the duration of the Negro National League. He also served as Vice President of the Negro National League.

    Pompez was at one time a “numbers broker” and one of the wealthiest men in Harlem, but by the 40's had "gone straight" and concentrated on his New York Cubans. In 1947, the New York Cubans won the Negro World Series, but Pompez could see the writing on the wall, and realized that the Negro Leagues had seen their best days.

    The following year, he arranged for his Cubans to be a farm club for the major league New York Giants. Giants owner, Horace Stoneham tapped into Pompez's knowledge of the Caribbean, and was able to sign many Latin players such as Orlando Cepeda, Pedro Ramos, Camilo Pascual and Tony Oliva through Pompez. One player that eluded Pompez’s scouting efforts - on June 7, 1950, Alex Pompez submitted a report recommending the signing of a right-handed pitched named Fidel Castro!

    Alex Pomez has been elected to the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame and was a member of the Hall of Fame’s special committee for the Negro Leagues.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  11. #36
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Uhmmmmmm, has anyone noticed the recent additions?
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  12. #37
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Yankee
    Uhmmmmmm, has anyone noticed the recent additions?
    Very impressive, some great stories there! Thanks for posting.

  13. #38
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Sultans of Swing
    Very impressive, some great stories there! Thanks for posting.
    Glad you like it.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  14. #39
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    Re: Negro League photos

    I'm posting a few pix from an article, which is a book summary. Some of the photos are of Cuban players, since it wasn't exclusively blacks that were in the Negro Leagues. All pix are from the article, so please read this to find info on the pictured players.

    For some strange reason, when I link the pictures, they don't show here, so I'll try doing something different the next time. Who knows?

    Enjoy!

    Before El Duque There was Luque
    and Before Robinson There was Estalella


    By F. Lennox Campello
    We all owe a tremendous debt to Jackie Robinson. Not only because of Major League baseball integration, but more importantly, because of the significant advancement of race relations worldwide that was the real aftermath of his actions during and after his baseball career. His sacrifices must never be forgotten or diminished, and Robinson was and will always be a hero, not just for Americans, but for mankind.

    Also important, and rarely discussed, are the Latin American baseball players, some of African ancestry, who played in the Majors before Robinson. These men, like Robinson, were often showered with abuses and insults, and like Robinson, were required to ignore these insults, but unlike Robinson, have now faded into forgotten pages of baseball history. I believe that these men played a crucial part in paving the way for Robinson. I also believe that they helped Branch Rickey to gather the courage to break officially the color line. And equally important, they helped the other team owners and white baseball players to accept African-Americans and other players of color, into the Major Leagues.

    This story is all about the Cubans, and the American confusion between race and ethnicity and the racist notion of the "one drop rule." At the heart of the story is the fact that Caucasian Cubans who could prove pure European ancestry were allowed to play in the United States, and many American white players played professional winter baseball in Cuba. In Cuba professional baseball was fully integrated (curiously though, amateur Cuban baseball was segregated and only white Cubans could play in amateur teams). As a result of this background, American baseball team owners saw first-hand many great Cuban players of all shades and races play in Cuba, and some of the more enterprising ones began to test the limits and patience of a racist society by introducing some of them to the US public many years before Robinson. But let us first review a little history.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  15. #40
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    Re: Negro League photos

    You may need to click on the file to learn of the players' names and the date the pic was taken, if available. No link, just attachments.

    There were a few more I'll have to reduce, which I thought were brilliant, but too large to fit here.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  16. #41
    A new year, a new era penguin4's Avatar
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    Re: Negro League photos

    The first one's Jackie, isn't it? Weird to see him in anything but a Dodgers uni.
    "You aint my b!tch, n!gga! Buy your own damn fries!" -- Barack Obama

  17. #42
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by penguin4
    The first one's Jackie, isn't it? Weird to see him in anything but a Dodgers uni.
    Before he was called up to the Brooklyn club by Branch Rickey in the so-called "Great Experiment", he was also on Brooklyn's farm team in Montreal, Canada. I saw a pic of that posted, but I haven't posted it here. I should. Not technically "Negro Leagues", but then again, it is Jackie Robinson.

    BTW, that first pic is in 1944 of him with the Kansas City Monarchs.

    Here he is, congratulating Sandy Koufax (who recently turned 70) on a win.



    L.A. County Supervisor Warren Dorn and Jackie Robinson, congratulate Dodger pitcher Sandy Koufax following 2-1 win over San Francisco Giants.

    June 17, 1965
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  18. #43
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Jackie in Montreal (and other images):









    Photographs of Jackie Robinson on April 18, 1946 when he broke the true color line with the Montreal Royals of the International League. He is shown here in his first game ever with the Royals, not too coincidentally in a game at Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City.

    On April 18, 1946 in a crowded Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City, Jackie Robinson became the first Black athlete to play for a minor league team. With an impressive hitting display: a three run homerun, a solid single, two bunt singles, and speed that led to 2 stolen bases and two balks home, the rookie second baseman and the Montreal Royals beat the hometown Jersey City Giants 14 -1.



    Wearing #9 in Montreal



    Jackie on February 9, 1949 signing the contract for his breakout MVP-winning season. This was the year he was allowed to “take the gloves off” and became the player that led to his signature season. Jackie was held back by in his two previous seasons years because of Branch Rickey and “The Experiment.” Jackie is shown here with Dodger manager Burt Shotton and GM Branch Rickey signing for $17,500. Jackie’s anemic salary was a function of the Dodgers simply being able to get away with it because of their habitual cheapness.



    Not a good pic, but it's credited with being taken on his debut: Apr 15, 1947



    Fantastic image of Jackie Robinson being congratulated by Chuck Dressen in the rowdy Dodger locker room. Robinson has just hit an upper deck home run in the 14th inning off Robin Roberts to give the Dodgers a critical 9-8 win over the Phillies. Not only that but Jackie saved the game in the 13th by making a great catch of an Eddie Waitkus line drive throwing to second for a double play injuring his elbow. This victory keeps the Brooklyn’s in a first place tie with the Giants and send them into the famed playoff series that made Bobby Thomson & Ralph Branca household names.



    Historically important image of the great Jackie Robinson being presented the Most Valuable Player Award for the 1949 season by Ford Frick. This moving event occurred on July 7, 1950 at Ebbets Field.



    Stunning images from the day that Jackie Robinson became the first African American to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Posed with his fellow inductees Edd Roush, Bob Feller and Bill McKechnie all holding their plaques. July 24, 1962.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  19. #44
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Here are two more, the first of which I found unusually and was pleasantly surprised.
    Attached Images
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
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  20. #45
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    Re: Negro League photos

    1887 Cuban Giants:

    http://www.nlbpa.com/1887_cuban_giants.html

    I'll post some individual player pix later on.

    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  21. #46
    NYYF Legend

    Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Yankee


    1944 Washington Homestead Grays:

    Front L to Right: Jelly Jackson, Ray Battle, Edward Robinson, Sam Bankhead, Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard, Dave Hoskins, Jerry Benjamin, and Cool Papa Bell.




    Buck Leonard


    Hey Brad... thanks for all these photos

    Just wanted to add before the new day arrives that on this day back in 1972, Commissioner Bowie Kuhn announces the Special Committee on the Negro League Hall of Fame selection of Buck Leonard and Josh Gibson.

    They would become the second and third former Negro Leagues players to become Hall of Fame members later in the year... 34 years ago.
    Just a Sox Fan with a Yankee Wife in tow... and with one little Red Sox fan now welcoming her new baby Yankee fan sister into "our" Yankees/Red Sox World.

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  22. #47
    R-I-P, Mr. Nelson Mandela Jersey Yankee's Avatar
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Visbeck
    Hey Brad... thanks for all these photos

    Just wanted to add before the new day arrives that on this day back in 1972, Commissioner Bowie Kuhn announces the Special Committee on the Negro League Hall of Fame selection of Buck Leonard and Josh Gibson.

    They would become the second and third former Negro Leagues players to become Hall of Fame members later in the year... 34 years ago.
    Thanks for the info, Dave!


    1927 Negro League Japan Tour magazine featuring "Biz" Mackey.

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/fea...ball/1883.html
    BELOW: Moses Fleetwood Walker, the very first profesional African-American baseball player.
    Attached Images
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

  23. #48
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    Dave Visbeck's Avatar
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    Re: Negro League photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Yankee
    Thanks for the info, Dave!


    BELOW: Moses Fleetwood Walker, the very first profesional African-American baseball player.




    I see you've got Moses here. When you're talking about the first professional
    African-American baseball player... you're talking about maybe in the organized Major League level at the time? It was in 1884 that Moses and his brother Welday had played with an AA expansion team called the Toledo Blue Stockings. The AA League had already been around since its first season of play in 1883 with 8 organized teams. Then some expansion came to that league.

    In 1884, the NL still held 8 teams... but the newer AA League had jumped to having 13 teams playing in the 1884 season. Not only that, a brand new UA League joined the Major League ranks with 12 teams in play during 1884. There were now 33 teams considered at the Major League level!

    All this said brings me to this man...

    Bud Fowler. Heshould maybe be considered as the possible first African-American or Negro professional player... only because he joined a white professional team in New Castle, Pennsylvania in 1878.
    Just a Sox Fan with a Yankee Wife in tow... and with one little Red Sox fan now welcoming her new baby Yankee fan sister into "our" Yankees/Red Sox World.

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    Re: Negro League photos


    Buck O'Neil stands with a statue of himself at the
    Negro League Museum in Kansas City.
    AP


    Better late than never
    O'Neil, other Negro Leaguers up for Hall election

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Buck O'Neil's lean, sinewy frame is stooped just a bit, his grudging concession to 94 years.

    A captivating storyteller, he delights audiences with tales of Satchel Paige and Cool Papa Bell and his days as a player and manager in the Negro Leagues.

    He was 75 when he first shot his age in golf. He's still shooting his age, too, though now, he says, "it's not a good score anymore."

    Since 1990, he's been a tireless fundraiser and goodwill ambassador for the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City's historic jazz district, traveling the country to keep the legacy of black baseball alive.
    Dr King (1929-68): Make the Dream a Reality.
    RIP, Nelson Mandela, Jackie #42 & Rosa Parks; Ali: Get up…get up; Isaac Hayes; Stevie Wonder: Isn't She Lovely?; Dr J: Fear the 'Fro; Smokin' Joe

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