View Poll Results: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

Voters
71. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    9 12.68%
  • No

    31 43.66%
  • Not in my lifetime

    20 28.17%
  • Are you serious!?

    11 15.49%
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 65
  1. #1

    Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    I don’t exactly remember who said it, which thread it was even in or when I even read it, but I do remember copy and pasting something from a discussion in one of the many Pedro threads around the internet that described him in his prime in a way I thought was unique, interesting and possibly even factual.

    At his peak? I can say without hesitation that I believe that Pedro '99-'00 was the best there ever was and the best there ever will be. I think that no one has ever had as good a two year period as those two Pedro years, and I'm not just talking about pitchers. I don't think anyone's ever been as good at anything as Pedro was at throwing a baseball. I'm talking Einstein's '21 season, Churchill's '41-45 campaign, and Hendrix's '67-68

    Pedro’s ‘99-00 was better.
    While I understand the concept of that with pitching, quality is in large part of a function of quantity, I feel that a lot of people don’t place enough value on the quality of Pedro’s work and just how significantly he was able to distance himself from his contemporaries.

    Just look at the type of pitcher he was to display such mind numbing dominance. Before his shoulder injury in 2001, I don’t think it would be stretching reality to state Pedro had the best repertoire of any pitcher... ever. Most of the better pitchers in the game’s history implemented two overwhelming pitches in their arsenal that could consistently get hitters out in dominant fashion. For instance, Nolan Ryan and Sandy Koufax had their fastball and curve, Gibson and Carlton had their fastball and slider, Clemens had/his fastball and splitter, etc.

    Pedro on the other hand, featured three dominant out-pitches: a 95-98 mph four-seam fastball which he could spot anywhere in the zone with precise pin-point location and would literally “explode” on hitters as it reached the plate. If there was ever such a thing as a “rising fastball”, Pedro’s was the perfect example of such. He would combine an overpowering fastball with an even more lethal pitch than any of the aforementioned - a change-up, thrown with exactly the same arm motion and arm angle as the fastball, only it would arrive at the plate 16-20 mph slower than heater, making hitters swing and miss by embarrassing margins. Pedro also had the ability to move the change across the K-Zone as it broke downward in what can only accurately be described as screwball-action movement on it, earning it the name of being a “Bugs Bunny” change-up. Although significantly less impressive than the other two main pitches, Pedro also had one of the better curves in the game, frequently making hitters look as if they were just seeing their first as 12-year old little leaguers. You knew he had three unearthly pitches that he would thrown in any count to any hitter in any game situation, and throw it for a strike. You could watch a Pedro start and make a guessing game out of trying to guess which pitch was coming next – was it the overpowering heater, the paralyzing change or the wicked breaking ball? Each was just as likely as the next, especially on those rare three-ball counts, and that’s one of the reasons he was so special and fun to watch.

    One must also considered the era in which Pedro pitched and note the immensely ridiculous advantages pitchers such as Walter Johnson, Mordecai Brown and Christy Mathewson had in their favor in the dead ball era as well as those such as Gibson and Koufax, who pitched in the 1960s.

    - They didn’t face lineups with a DH
    - They pitched off a mound 5" to 8" higher
    - Pitched with an expanded strike zone
    - Pitched in larger ballparks
    - Poor visibility in the CF batter’s eye
    - Faced hitters who never worked out or touched a weight
    - No body armor worn by hitters
    - No batting machines for hitters
    - No laser eye surgery for hitters
    - The ability to pitch inside without repercussions

    And here’s Pedro Martinez: a 5'10", 165 lb pitcher built like a bat boy, absolutely and throughly dominating hitters despite having every possible disadvantage thrown his way the likes of Walter Johnson and Bob Gibson never encountered. And yet, he's also besting them in raw, unadjusted numbers.

    In 2000....

    The AL ERA was an incomprehensibly inflated 4.92. Pedro’s ERA? 1.74. He’s the only starting pitcher in the history of baseball dating back to 1880 that ever posted an ERA more than three runs lower than the league average mark.

    [HTML]ERA YEAR DIFF PLAYER LEAGUE
    1 Pedro Martinez 2000 3.18 1.74 4.92
    2 Pedro Martinez 1999 2.80 2.07 4.87
    3 Greg Maddux 1994 2.66 1.56 4.22
    4 Greg Maddux 1995 2.55 1.63 4.18
    5 Amos Rusie 1894 2.54 2.78 5.32
    6 Roger Clemens 1997 2.53 2.05 4.57
    7 Dazzy Vance 1930 2.36 2.61 4.97
    8 Kevin Brown 1996 2.33 1.89 4.22
    9 Lefty Grove 1931 2.32 2.06 4.38
    10 Al Maul 1895 2.32 2.45 4.78 [/HTML]

    The second-best ERA in the league belonged to Roger Clemens at 3.70 - a difference of nearly two whole runs. Clemens was closer to the worst ERA in the league than he was to the best.

    Only four times in MLB history has an ERA-leading pitcher posted an average more than a run better than the runner-up, and Pedro is the owner of two of those seasons. The other being 1999 of course, when he posted a 2.07 ERA to David Cone’s 3.44. The other two were Dazzy Vance in 1930 and Greg Maddux in 1994.

    His Adjusted ERA+ of 285 is the best in the modern era of post-1900 baseball and second to only Tim Keefe’s 294 in 1880. And about Keefe’s 1880 season: At the time, the mound was just 45' from home plate and it took eight - that’s right, eight - balls to walk a single batter. Keefe also only pitched 105 innings in 1880, which all but eliminates him from the discussion anyway.

    Pedro allowed just 6.64 hits and walks per nine innings, setting an MLB record. The second best all-time? Guy Hecker’s 6.92... in 1882. They’re the only two pitchers in history to have a rate below seven. What's more? Pedro allowed more than 4 fewer (H+BB) than second-place Mike Mussina.

    His WHIP (essentially the same stat as the above) of 0.737 also tops the all-time list.

    [HTML]WHIP YEAR RATE
    1 Pedro Martinez 2000 .737
    2 Guy Hecker 1882 .769
    3 Walter Johnson 1913 .780
    4 Addie Joss 1908 .801
    5 Greg Maddux 1995 .811
    6 Charlie Sweeney 1884 .817
    7 Ed Walsh 1910 .820
    8 Christy Mathewson 1909 .828
    9 George Bradley 1880 .837
    Christy Mathewson 1908 .837 [/HTML]

    He allowed a mere 5.31 hits per 9 innings, which ties him for third best on the all-time single season list. However, when adjusted for performance against the league, he clearly comes out on top, with a rate 4.35 hits better than the average pitcher.

    [HTML]HITS/9 IP YEAR DIFF PLAYER LEAGUE
    1 Pedro Martinez 2000 4.35 5.31 9.66
    2 Nolan Ryan 1991 3.61 5.31 8.92
    3 Tommy Byrne 1949 3.28 5.74 9.02
    4 Randy Johnson 1997 3.27 6.21 9.48
    5 Hideo Nomo 1995 3.23 5.83 9.06
    6 Nolan Ryan 1977 3.20 5.96 9.16
    7 Pedro Martinez 1997 3.08 5.89 8.97
    8 Herb Score 1956 3.07 5.86 8.92
    9 Roger Clemens 1994 2.98 6.54 9.52
    10 Roger Clemens 1998 2.97 6.48 9.45 [/HTML]

    Some post-1900 MLB records set by Pedro (min. 200 IP for sake of credibility)

    [HTML]BATTING AVERAGE AGAINST YEAR RATE
    1 Pedro Martinez 2000 .167
    2 Luis Tiant 1968 .168
    3 Nolan Ryan 1972 .171
    4 Ed Reulbach 1906 .175
    5 Sandy Koufax 1965 .179
    6 Dutch Leonard 1914 .180
    7 Dave McNally 1968 .182
    8 Pedro Martinez 1997 .184
    Bob Gibson 1968 .184
    10 Carl Lundgren 1907 .185[/HTML]

    [HTML]ON-BASE AVERAGE AGAINST YEAR RATE
    1 Pedro Martinez 2000 .213
    2 Greg Maddux 1995 .224
    3 Sandy Koufax 1965 .227
    4 Pete Alexander 1915 .228
    5 Sandy Koufax 1963 .230
    6 Juan Marichal 1966 .230
    7 Dave McNally 1968 .232
    8 Bob Gibson 1968 .233
    9 Luis Tiant 1968 .233
    10 Babe Adams 1919 .235[/HTML]

    The following is an interesting figure brought up by fellow NYYF poster beaker23 in a different thread, who had his own compilation of a number that measured strikeouts per base runner. He concluded that only 36 times in MLB history since 1885 has there been a pitcher with a K/BR above 1 in a single-season.

    In 2000, Pedro struck out 284 batters while allowing just 128 hits and 32 walks for a total of 160 base runners (not including HBP) for a ML record rate of 1.78 K’s per BR. For good measure, he also has the second and fifth best. 2001 isn’t included because of limited IP.

    [HTML]STRIKEOUTS/BASE RUNNER YEAR RATE
    1 Pedro Martinez 2000 1.78
    2 Pedro Martinez 1999 1.59
    3 Randy Johnson 2001 1.48
    4 Randy Johnson 1998 1.40
    5 Pedro Martinez 1997 1.36[/HTML]

    Other fun numbers:

    Pedro struck out 284 batters in just 217 innings for a rate of 11.78 K’s per 9 IP, while the average pitcher whiffed a mere 6.27.

    He walked only 32, which means he struck out roughly 8.8 batters per 1 walk issued – an American League record.

    He had fifteen games in which he struck out 10 or more batters, and struck out 15 or more three times.

    On August 2, he pitched 9 IP, 5 H, 2 ER against the Seattle Mariners and his ERA rose from 1.38 to 1.42. How dominant do you have to be when you pitch a complete game, 2-run gem and your ERA rises?

    When he was on the mound, no pitcher in the AL went deeper into their outings on average than Pedro, would regularly pitch into the eighth inning at 7.5 IPS.

    American Leaguers had a .472 OPS against him.

    .
    .
    .


    All of the above are just facts and numbers anybody out there can find on their own if they look around. However, I won’t take credit for the following in-depth look at Pedro’s 2000 season by Allan Wood (some of the above was featured in his article as well), who writes the blog Joy Of Sox and is the author of a book on Babe Ruth and the 1918 Red Sox.

    A closer look into Martinez's 2000 season:

    He went 41 innings without issuing a walk (August 2, 7th inning to September 4, 2nd inning). What if a walk was eight balls now [as it was in 1880 when Tim Keefe had the only season that could rival Pedro's 2000 -- the plate was 45 feet from the mound]-- could Pedro go the entire season without passing a batter?

    On June 14, after twelve starts, his ERA was 0.99. Let me say that again: Martinez’s was 0.99 -- in mid-June! Up to that point, he had allowed 10 earned runs in 91.2 innings. His ERA never rose above 1.81 (September 14) and he finished at 1.74.

    Martinez faced only three batters in 112 of his 217 innings. He faced 3 or 4 batters in 179 innings -- 82.5% And he faced five or fewer batters in 206 of 217 innings -- a mind-boggling 94.9%. His other 11 innings were: 6 batters six times, 7 batters 3 times, eight batters once and nine batters once.

    Martinez registered at least one strikeout in more than 80% of his innings (177 of 217). He struck out the side 10% of the time (22 of 217). He never went more than two innings without at least one strikeout in an inning. A string of two K-less innings happened only four times:

    April 4: 6th and 7th innings
    May 17: 6th and 7th innings
    June 8: 4th and 5th innings
    August 2: 2nd and 3rd innings

    Working in a league where the average team scored 5.3 runs per game, Martinez allowed more than 3 earned runs only twice in 29 starts (June 25 and August 24). He allowed 2 runs or less in 21 starts and 1 run or less in 17 starts, and no runs in 10 starts.

    Here are the numbers on his six losses:

    0-6, 2.44 ERA -- 48 IP, 30 H, 13 R, 8 BB, 60 K

    In these six games, while Pedro was on the mound, his teammates scored a total of 4 runs -- an average of 0.75 runs per nine innings.

    American Leaguers hit .167, 60 points lower than second-place Tim Hudson (.227).

    American Leaguers had a .213 on-base average, 78 points lower than second-place Mike Mussina (.291).

    American Leaguers had a .259 slugging percentage, 121 points lower than second-place Bartolo Colon (.380).

    Left-handed hitters had a .150 batting average, 56 points lower than second-place Roger Clemens (.206).

    Right-handed hitters had a .184 batting average, 26 points lower than second-place Orlando Hernandez (.210).

    With men on base, batters hit .160, 21 points lower than second-place Jeff Nelson - a relief pitcher (.181).

    His ERA at home was 1.84 -- second-place Mike Mussina’s home ERA was 2.90.

    His ERA on the road was 1.66 -- second-place David Wells’s road ERA was 3.24. Only seven pitchers had a road ERA under 4.00.

    He allowed 1.33 walks per nine innings -- only David Wells allowed less, 1.21. But Wells allowed more hits than any other major league pitcher, 266.


    Sources:

    Baseball-Reference

    Sabermetric Baseball Encyclopedia

    MLB Historical Stats

    Retrosheet

    Sons of Sam Horn



  2. #2

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    never in the American league
    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Yankee
    Who in their right mind would pay several thousand bucks to have some chick poop on their face like a beard?


  3. #3
    NYYF Legend

    Evil Empire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Earth

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Nope. It might happen in the NL though
    Crush it with your mind vice.

  4. #4

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Even in the NL, I don't think it'll happen. The fact that he's knocked out records that were set in the 1880s is just ridiculous. Look at the time span he and Maddux are amongst for the best WHIP ever... seriously, significantly less IP or not, that's an absolute JOKE.

  5. #5
    NYYF Legend

    Evil Empire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Earth

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Btw, Good job putting all this together.
    Crush it with your mind vice.

  6. #6

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by Circle Change
    Even in the NL, I don't think it'll happen. The fact that he's knocked out records that were set in the 1880s is just ridiculous. Look at the time span he and Maddux are amongst for the best WHIP ever... seriously, significantly less IP or not, that's an absolute JOKE.
    i think if Santana was in the NL this year, perhaps pitching for a team like the cardinals, he would have a chance to put up some of those numbers
    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Yankee
    Who in their right mind would pay several thousand bucks to have some chick poop on their face like a beard?


  7. #7

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    1999 Era: 5.07
    2000 Era: 4.97

  8. #8
    Call now. Soriambi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    New Jersey

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Great post. My answer would be no-I don't think I'll ever see anyone match that. His numbers from 99-00 were just incredible. We'll certainly never see it again in the AL, but I don't think we'll see it in the NL either.
    -Kevin

    "My point is you can't compare things with statistics." Joe Morgan


    RIP, Pete.

  9. #9

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by pedromartinezfan
    1999 Era: 5.07
    2000 Era: 4.97
    I know where you're getting those figures. That's for a league average pitcher in Fenway Park.

    As for the American League ERA as a whole:

    http://www.baseball-reference.com/leagues/AL.shtml

    or

    http://www.baseballprospectus.com/st...erages1999.php
    http://www.baseballprospectus.com/st...erages2000.php

    My Sabermetric Baseball Encyclopedia has similar numbers, off by just a point: 4.87 and 4.92 as opposed to 4.86 and 4.91 given by Baseball Reference and BP.

  10. #10

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by Circle Change
    I know where you're getting those figures. That's for a league average pitcher in Fenway Park.
    I know that, maybe you were just doing it for show, but for the ERA+ number, those are the ERA's.

  11. #11

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by pedromartinezfan
    I know that, maybe you were just doing it for show, but for the ERA+ number, those are the ERA's.
    You can use the actual league ERA and get pretty much the exact same number:

    1.) 4.97 / 1.74 x 100 = 285.632184
    2.) 4.91 / 1.74 x 101 = 285.005747

    Either way, Pedro had a 285 ERA+. What's the problem?

  12. #12
    NYYF Legend

    nhyankeefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    New Hampshire

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    If someone even comes close to Pedro's numbers I hope I'm around to see it. I'll never forget Pedro's 1 hitter - 17k game against the Yanks in Sep 1999. That was probably the most dominating pitching performance I've ever seen.

  13. #13

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Because "*100" is there because the average pitcher will have a 100 ERA+, not a 101 ERA+. Using your 1999 league ERA and multiplying by 101, Pedro would have a 238 ERA+.

  14. #14

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by pedromartinezfan
    Because "*100" is there because the average pitcher will have a 100 ERA+, not a 101 ERA+. Using your 1999 league ERA and multiplying by 101, Pedro would have a 238 ERA+.
    That's only if we assume Fenway had a pitcher's park factor of 101 in 1999 and the not the 104 it did have.

    4.87 / 2.07 x 104 = 244.6763 = 245 ERA+

  15. #15
    Mean WOOOOOOOOOOOO By God Gene S2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Can a pitcher again have a...
    1.74 ERA? Maybe.
    .167 BAA? Probably not.
    0.74 WHIP? I wouldn't bet on it.
    8.8 K/BB? Probably in the NL, not the AL.
    285 ERA+?

    Now, can one pitcher better (or at least come close to) ALL those numbers in the same season? Hell no.

  16. #16

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by S2
    Can a pitcher again have a...
    1.74 ERA? Maybe.
    .167 BAA? Probably not.
    0.74 WHIP? I wouldn't bet on it.
    8.8 K/BB? Probably in the NL, not the AL.
    285 ERA+?

    Now, can one pitcher better (or at least come close to) ALL those numbers in the same season? Hell no.
    1999 was pretty good too!

    This was the quintessential Pedro Martinez season and experience. It was the year most casual fans will continually point to as the very best of his career. It was the season where there was talk of him winning 30 games and breaking Nolan Ryan’s single-season strikeout record, among other feats. It was the season of his memorable All-Star Game performance at Fenway in which he struck out the first four batters and five overall in two scoreless innings of work, the season in which he threw the complete game 1-hit, 17 strikeout performance against the Yankees in the Bronx, the season during which he came out of the bullpen in the decisive ALDS game in Cleveland and shutdown one of the five most productive offenses in MLB history for six no-hit innings with a sore back, throwing no harder than 89 mph. This is the season that best represented the image of Pedro being the dominant, overpowering, flame throwing strikeout king.

    In 1999, the AL ERA was 4.87... Pedro’s was 2.07 -a difference of 2.8 runs, the second biggest and most impressive differential ever. Who has the first? Oh... yeah.

    The second best ERA in the league belonged to David Cone at 3.44 - 1.37 points higher than Pedro. His Adjusted ERA+ of 245 had him pitching 145% more effectively than his contemporaries - eighth best all-time since 1900.

    Pedro's 313 K’s were 113 more than runner-up Chuck Finley.

    His 160 hits allowed and 37 walks totaled to 197 base runners (not including HBP). Divide that by his number of strikeouts (313) and Pedro struck out 1.59 batters per BR (base runner) – the second best mark in MLB history. Who has the first? Oh... yeah.

    He walked just 37 batters all year which means he struck out 8.5 batters before he passed one.

    His rate of 13.2 K’s per 9 Ips set an MLB record as he was the first starting pitcher in history to ever push the figure above 13 and still stands as the AL record. What makes this feat even more inhuman? The average pitcher struck out a mere 6.2 batters per 9 IP in 1999 - a difference of 7 K’s per nine innings - easily the biggest gap in the game’s history.

    He had 19 games in which he struck out 10 or more batters, including six in which he struck out FIFTEEN or more, tying the MLB record set by Nolan Ryan in 1973 who started 39 games that season, ten more than Pedro in 1999.

    If his total number of strikeouts aren’t enough for you, just consider what he had to do to even reach that figure: On August 18th, he sat at a mere but respectable 205. Over his final eight regular season starts, he would go on the most ridiculous strikeout assaults in modern history as he whiffed 107 batters over 62 IP in his final eight outings — If you don’t have a calculator handy, that’s 13.4 strikeouts per start, 15.5 per 9 IP and nearly 2 K’s per inning. What’s more is that he had a 1.16 ERA over that stretch and walked eight batters in all – 13.3 K’s per 1 walk issued.

    You can also make the case that no other pitcher other than Pedro himself was ever stingier at allowing baserunners than he in 1999. His (H+BB)/9 IP was a league leading 8.31 with the next best in the AL being Eric Milton, who allowed 11.1 - a gap of 2.7 BR9. An astonishing number, and one the game had never seen before. For example, in 1968, Bob Gibson allowed just 7.68 BR9, yet 8 NL pitchers were within 2 BR9 of this mark. In Guidry’s magical 1978 season he allowed 8.52 BR9, but the nearest competitor was within 1.05 of that number. Pedro’s (H+BB)/9 in 1999 is the third best mark all-time when adjusted for performance against the league. Who has the first? Oh... yeah.

    The only pitcher who tops Pedro it seems, IS Pedro.

  17. #17
    NYYF Legend

    TommyK8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Trumbull, CT

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Amazingly, despite Pedro having the most dominant year by a starting pitching in the history of the modern era, and having a batting champion in Nomar Garciaparra at .372, and having the AL's leader in saves (Derek Lowe with 42), the 2000 Red Sox finished only 85-77. That was good for second place in the AL East, and in that particular year, only 2.5 games behind the Yankees, who won only 87 in the regular season. Unfortunately, the Red Sox did not have much of a supporting cast, especially in the pitching department. Despite such a huge season, Pedro's record was 18-6 in 29 starts. The Sox did not have a great offense in those days, with a lineup that had regulars of Varitek, Daubach, Offerman, Garciaparra, O'Leary, Everett, and Nixon. A bunch of platoon players filled in the rest of the at bats, such as Darren Lewis, Mike Stanley and Manny Alexander, and Dante Bichette was a trading deadline acquisition. The ownership at the time, and Dan Duquette was content to try and patch together a rotation from guys who were long past their primes (Ramon Martinez-27 games started, 6.13 ERA), Pete Schourek and Jeff Fassero. This team was emblematic of some frustrating days for Red Sox fans--several great players to build around, but a less than full commitment from ownership to bring in the supporting cast.

  18. #18

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Hey, Circle Change, where are you seeing these old Pedro videos?

  19. #19

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    To clarify on the K/BR numbers, its actually 38 (I had missed a Doc Gooden and a Curt SChilling season), and that's for staring pitchers. Adding in releivers and limited inning seasons, its more like 108 times.

    This isn't taking anything away from Pedro, just pre-empting any nitpickers.

    For some Pedro fluffing, consider that his 1.78 K/BR in 2000 was a higher ratio than Dennis Eckersley in 1990, and Eric Gagne in 2003. Literally like having an ace closer be your starting pitcher.

  20. #20
    Grenade-Free Zone OxDiesel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    CT -- Fairfield County

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Without question, some of the most absolutely ridiculously BANANA numbers ever compiled on the mound. And to think that, 15 years ago, people actually thought he wouldn't be as good as Ramon. What makes it even more amazing is how little (for a pitcher) this guy actually is. Imagine if Pedro had a body like Unit or a build like Rocket? VERY scary...

    Well written term paper, Circle -- with endnotes, too!

  21. #21

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by pedromartinezfan
    Hey, Circle Change, where are you seeing these old Pedro videos?
    Namely ESPN Classic for the most part. I really only have the basics and I'm not too happy about the fact NESN doesn't sell any videos of their telecasts, because I have about 55-60 separate Pedro starts from 1999-2001 I'd like to own, and I'd buy every damn one of them... eventually.

    Right now, I just have:

    - Complete game, 17 K's vs. Yankees from Sept. 99
    - 1999 ALDS Game 5 vs. Cleveland
    - 1999 ALCS Game 3 vs. Yankees (7 IP, 0 ER, 12 K)
    - Duel with Clemens in May 2000 (9 IP, 0 ER, 9 K - 128 pitches)
    - May 30, 2001 vs. Yankees (8 IP, 0 ER, 13 K)
    - June 4, 2001 vs. Yankees (This is actually the game where he frayed his rotator cuff. You can see it in his face when he walks back to the dugout). Of course, it didn't become obvious until his next start against Philadelphia when he gave up 5 ER and was throwing 88 mph.

    Whenever the Yankees/Red Sox are playing, you can bank on at least three or four of these being played a couple times throughout the series on Classic. Of course, you have crap like the 2003 ALCS muddled in too.

    Not that it wasn't a great series guys, but c'mon, you didn't beat PEDRO, you beat pedro.

  22. #22
    Grenade-Free Zone OxDiesel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    CT -- Fairfield County

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by Circle Change
    Whenever the Yankees/Red Sox are playing, you can bank on at least three or four of these being played a couple times throughout the series on Classic. Of course, you have crap like the 2003 ALCS muddled in too.

    Not that it wasn't a great series guys, but c'mon, you didn't beat PEDRO, you beat pedro.
    FWIW, he looked pretty freakin' good for 7 innings.

  23. #23

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Quote Originally Posted by OxDiesel
    FWIW, he looked pretty freakin' good for 7 innings.
    Yeah, The Man showed up for Game 7. He really had a great chance of being the winning pitcher and having statues erected in his honor outside Fenway if Gump hadn't gumped. One thing I think Yankee fans should give him credit for is that when he was getting hit in the seventh and eighth innings, he didn't throw a bunch of curveballs or changeups with which he may have gotten out of it with -- He came at them with 95+ heat pitch-after-pitch after he'd been throwing 89 mph all game, throwing off timing, buckling with breaking balls.

    He didn't do that in the end, and it was probably incredibly stupid as he wasn't anything like in his prime, but he did it the right way anyway.

    However, if this game had taken place in 1999-2001, pitch count wouldn't have been an issue and he would've won that game. We all know that. A 5-2 lead? No way he blows it.

  24. #24
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    New Hampshire

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Bravo on all the information. This just goes to show you exactly how good Pedro was in his prime. I doubt his performance will ever be topped... but I voted for not in my lifetime because anything can happen down the road.
    [SIZE=3][FONT=Comic Sans MS]-[COLOR=Red]Guimonster[/COLOR]-[/FONT] [/SIZE]

  25. #25

    Re: Will Pedro's 2000 season ever be topped?

    Great post, Circle Change. And FYI, I believe the quote you were talking about was from SoSH.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts