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    George speaks out: on Jeter Staying Out Late, Lucchino, Stanton and more...

    This interview with George is very interesting...I laughed out loud at several quotes (especially the ones about Lucchino and his first team being posterchildren for birth control )...I thought the stuff about Jeter was especially interesting because I haven't heard him say things like that before but I think he's got a point...some of the rest of the quotes are just George being George -- and you can tell he's been just waiting to answer some things

    http://www.nydailynews.com/front/sto...8p-44350c.html

    30 years of George
    The Boss looks back, sounds off
    in exclusive sit-down with News



    By WAYNE COFFEY

    TAMPA – Thirty years ago this week, a 42-year-old shipbuilder from Cleveland and a group of partners purchased the Yankees from CBS, a transaction consummated with $8.8 million, and an infamous assurance.
    "I won't be active in the day-to-day operations of the club," the shipbuilder said.

    The reign of George M. Steinbrenner III has been the longest of any owner in the club's 100-year history, and the most eventful. It has included six World Championships and unprecedented popularity, cementing the Yankees' standing as the most storied franchise in sport.

    It has also included two suspensions, 21 managerial changes, innumerable public floggings and enough turmoil to fill a century's worth of back pages.

    Sitting in a spotless conference room overlooking Legends Field, a Yankee blue carpet beneath him and framed photos of Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle and other Yankee greats behind him, Steinbrenner looked back at his three decades at the pinstriped helm in a three-hour interview with the Daily News. A broad-shouldered 6-0, 200-pounder with immaculately groomed gray-brown hair and slacks with a crease as sharp as a knife, Steinbrenner, now 72 and a grandfather of 12, was by turns contrite and charming, carping and crafty. He offered candid thoughts on his best and worst moments; a stern admonition for Joe Torre's staff; and a pointed commentary on Derek Jeter.

    Dallas Green, No. 17 in George's managerial parade, once called Steinbrenner a "Jekyll and Hyde character," a man capable of soaring kindness and Machiavellian meanness — all on the same day. Through it all, he has been the inimitable Boss.

    "I'm not a lovable leader," Steinbrenner says, "but I've always tried to do what I thought was right."

    DN: You were very restrained in your public comments after the loss to the Angels. If that same result had occurred 20 years earlier, there might have been an apology to the people of New York and a bunch of people looking for work. Have you changed?

    GS: I've mellowed a little bit. Time does things to people, but don't think I'm totally mellowing. When we don't produce I am very tough on my people. This year I've worked as hard as I've ever worked between seasons. (Instead of) apologizing, I'm putting that energy into next year's team.

    DN: Do you think the public perception of you has changed, as well?

    GS: I think it has. There are two ways it can change. No. 1, they understand what you were trying to do all along, and they side with you. That's the way you prefer to have it. No. 2, you change just because you age.

    I believe a man goes through three stages: the first is as a young man or collegian, the second is when you think you know a lot and the third is, "Gee, you look good!"

    DN: What stage are you in?

    GS: The third (laughs). You get so tired of people saying that.

    DN: You made a comment once that having people fear you is a positive thing. Are you as feared now by people in the Yankee organization as you used to be?

    GS: Probably not, because I've put so much emphasis on the organization. I admit (being feared) was an important thing for me, probably too important sometimes. That's not a great thing, but I'm not Eisenhower. I'm more of a Patton. I don't want the love of my people. I want their respect.

    DN: What do you remember about your first day of work at the Stadium?

    GS: I walked in and saw flowers on every desk. Freshly cut flowers. I said, "What the hell is this? Is it Flowers Day? Is it Secretary's Day?" Somebody said, "Isn't that wonderful? Mr. Burke does this every day for us." (Former Yankee president) Mike Burke is a guy who I admired tremendously. He was a real heartthrob type of guy. Everybody liked him. I loved him, but for what I wanted, he didn't fit with me. When I saw the flowers, that was the trigger. I got involved.

    DN: What were your initial impressions of the club you bought?

    GS: When I first saw the team picture, it looked like a poster for birth control. (Mike) Kekich and (Fritz) Peterson had their wife-swapping deal. The Yankees were a doormat. I went to spring training and saw a lot of things I didn't like. I remember writing on an empty lineup card to Ralph Houk, "These men need haircuts." They didn't look like a team.

    DN: Joe Torre has become a New York icon. Judging by some of your actions, such as the way his contract was dragged out last year, it sometimes seems that you think he gets too much credit and you don't get enough?

    GS: Joe is the greatest friend I've ever had as a manager. It's a great relationship. I don't want to destroy that, but I will tell you this: I want his whole staff to understand that they have got to do better this year. I will not see him drop back into the way he was before. Right now he's a sure-fire Hall of Famer. Before he came to the Yankees he didn't even have a job. Three different times as manager he didn't deliver, and was fired. Look how far he's come. He's come that way because of an organization, and he's got to remember that. I'm glad that Joe is an icon. He's a hell of a guy, a tremendous manager and tremendous figure for New York. I just want his coaches to understand that just being a friend of Joe Torre's is not enough. They've got to produce for him. Joe Torre and his staff have heard the bugle.

    DN: Any coaches in particular who have to shape up?

    GS: I'm not going to get into that. Those fellas know who they are.

    DN: If the bugle has sounded, does that mean we will see changes?

    GS: I see no movement, but I see them working harder. Our defense needs work, and part of our whole spring training will be devoted to defense this year. We had a wonderful season, but our pitching went to pieces at the end of the year.

    DN: With four months hindsight, what are your thoughts about the new collective-bargaining agreement?

    GS: Naturally we don't like it. This thing is aimed at the Yankees. When I came into baseball, we were a dog team. You work your butt off to build it up and then you are faced with an additional penalty?

    I am a Bud Selig man. I consider him a good friend. He's a master at building people together. But while I'm loyal to Bud Selig, the biggest beneficiary in this whole plan are the Milwaukee Brewers. That doesn't seem quite right. I don't know how he sleeps at night sometimes.

    The president of Yale (Richard Charles Levin), who I very much respect as an academician, is on the prized committee Selig set up to determine what the Yankees should pay to others. I said to him one night leaving a meeting, "Well, how much are you going to give Grambling? Because I know they need money and I know Yale is very, very wealthy..." (laughs) That was the end of that.

    DN: The agreement doesn't require teams that are receiving money to spend it on players. Did the union drop the ball there?

    GS: Somebody certainly should've seen that.

    DN: Put last year's payroll and revenues with the new formula and you'd have to pay about $55 million to other clubs. How much is this changing the way you do business?

    GS: It's got to change it. That's a real chunk. A lot of people's whole payrolls are that. It's caused us to make slices. What we've tried to do is eliminate those perks and fringes that we would be granting without thinking. How many cell phones do we have out there? How many cars do we have out there?

    DN: Is the elimination of employee dental benefits part of the same mindset?

    GS: The dental-benefit package has not at this moment been cut. Believe me, it's a waste of money in a lot of ways. The San Francisco Chronicle ran an article by Mark Schiller (senior fellow in medical studies at the Pacific Research Institute), who says the same thing. The headline was, "'Heartless George' Sets Good Example In Questioning Dental Coverage." Our insurance people are looking at it.

    DN: How can you say the new CBA is changing your modus operandi when you go out and sign Hideki Matsui and Jose Contreras to deals worth a combined $53 million?

    GS: Look, they can say our payroll is this and our payroll is that. I am within the agreement we signed. Every one of these guys who complain about us signed that damn agreement, too. We're going to explore everything we can. We're going more global than ever before. We have our partnerships with Manchester United, the premier soccer team in the world, and now with the Yomiuri Giants. If we have to pay a penalty for going over and our fans are coming forward with their hard-earned money for us, we'll do it. We're going to put the best product out there we can.

    Where do you get the best player in Cuba and the best player in Japan for the price I got them for? We've made some very good buys. And we're not done yet.

    DN: John Henry, your former partner and owner of the Red Sox, was quoted as saying after you signed Contreras that he "was and is a big risk." What's your response?

    GS: That's just ridiculous. It makes him look stupid because they did everything they could to get him, including offering more money than we did. They offered $10 million to get him away from us. I give credit to Mr. Contreras. He wanted to play for the Yankees.

    John Henry put down $1 million to buy into the Yankees. He gets back $4.7 million. I hope he does as well for his partners.

    DN: Larry Lucchino, president of the Red Sox, called the Yankees "the evil empire" after the signing.

    GS: That's B.S. That's how a sick person thinks. I've learned this about Lucchino: he's baseball's foremost chameleon of all time. He changes colors depending on where's he's standing. He's been at Baltimore and he deserted them there, and then went out to San Diego, and look at what trouble they're in out there. When he was in San Diego, he was a big man for the small markets. Now he's in Boston and he's for the big markets. He's not the kind of guy you want to have in your foxhole. He's running the team behind John Henry's back. I warned John it would happen, told him, "Just be careful." He talks out of both sides of his mouth. He has trouble talking out of the front of it.

    DN: Mayor Bloomberg backed off Rudy Giuliani's deal on his last day in office for the city to share the cost of a new Yankee Stadium. Does that bother you?

    GS: Rudy Giuliani is my all–time pal. He's a superhero. I doubt there are too many people in the history of this country who could go through what he did. This mayor is a very good mayor, because he's a tough businessman. Sure, it bothers me. How long he's going to hold us off I don't know. But I think we'll get there somehow.

    DN: Why should a nickel of public money go to build a new Yankee Stadium for the richest franchise in sports?

    GS: Stadiums are being built everywhere by cities. Very few of them are built privately, and the one in San Francisco (PacBell) has deep financial problems, from what I hear. Building a stadium in New York costs two or three times what it would anywhere else, because of the labor unions and their power. And that's OK with me. I'm not against them. It's still a big puzzle that has got to be answered.

    DN: Where will the new Yankee Stadium be built?

    GS: I think we're going to stay in the Bronx. We have a feel for the Bronx. They need it there.

    DN: How big an impact do you foresee Hideki Matsui having?

    GS: I think he'll have a big impact. There's a large Japanese population in New York. We just have to be patient with him and he'll deliver. Too many of scouts have said, "He'll do it, Boss," for me (to be concerned).

    DN: How much revenue has the impasse between the YES Network and Chuck Dolan and Cablevision cost you?

    GS: It has cost me a lot, but it has really cost him, too.

    DN: For years you've spoken of the connection you have with the doormen and cabdrivers and other rank–and–file fans. Yet several million Yankee fans last year couldn't watch more than a handful of games because of the dispute. Do you feel any obligation to get this thing settled?

    GS: I'm not really involved in the network. The main thing I do is deliver product.

    Everything is having product to put on to make people want to watch. We're dedicated to that with the Yankees – and with the Nets.

    The Attorney General of New Jersey has brought suit against Cablevision for being a monopoly. We have a lawsuit against them, same thing. If the Attorney General of New York ever joins that, that should be some lawsuit for them to battle. I think it (could) have a lasting effect on the entire television industry. You get a good attorney general and they start to get (an investigation going), you never can tell. Nobody likes that on their back. I think Chuck, as a good soldier, may be regarding what his fellow people in the business think and maybe we'll get something done.

    I admire Chuck Dolan. He came from Cleveland with very little and built this magnificent empire. I am proud he's my friend. I don't know, except that I thought they were going to come with us.

    DN: If you are such good friends, why not just sit down and hammer out a deal?

    GS: Because then you get accused of pushing in over the man (Leo Hindery) running the network. I have complete faith in my guys. I'm hopeful, because I do care about the fans.

    DN: Loyalty is something you've long spoken of as the hallmark of a good employee. How do you reconcile that with the treatment of Mike Stanton, who helped you win three World Series and was always a standup guy – and was given 15 minutes to decide on a contract offer?

    GS: I like Mike Stanton very much. But this was a decision that was made by the total organization. I will not have Mike leaving here thinking that I got rid of him. Far from it. I went back to (all of my baseball people) and said, "Are you sure you mean this?"

    What his agent was evidently asking for was more than Cash (Brian Cashman) felt we could pay. I was not part of that (15–minute) deal. You'd have to ask Cash about that.

    DN: What has been your greatest thrill as owner of the Yankees?

    GS: The biggest moment I had in sports was the opening game of the ('76) World Series in Cincinnati. I was an Ohio boy, coming back there. I was standing in Riverfront Stadium. It was cold. It was packed. I said I was going to put the Yankees back in the Series, and I did, even though I didn't want to lose four straight.

    DN: What has been your low point?

    GS: Probably the two suspensions. The suspension by Bowie Kuhn (after the felonious campaign contribution to President Nixon), which I didn't understand how that related and I never will understand it, but OK, he's the boss. He does what he must do. The other one was Fay Vincent (for paying gambler Howie Spira $40,000 in return for damaging information on Dave Winfield). That was a very tough one to take. He did what he realistically thought was the right thing to do.

    DN: How does a guy with your wealth and prominence hook up with a guy like Howie Spira?

    GS: Bad hookup. Bad hookup. There were reasons, but no reason would've been good enough to have done that.

    DN: What are some of your other regrets?

    GS: I wish Dave Winfield and I hadn't pulled apart. There were things that have never become public. I will not get into them. I don't hold them against David. I've tried to make amends with him and I think we are friends today. I consider him one of the greatest athletes I've ever known.

    Yogi was a big mistake – to fire him (the way I did). I sent somebody to do it. I should've done it myself. I owed that to Yogi Berra. We have a very strong relationship now – one of my best in all of baseball. He's just a wonderful human being.

    DN: You've reached out and made amends to both of them in recent years. Is this some of the mellowing you were talking about?

    GS: (Nods). I felt very good about it when Yogi came back (to the Stadium). I could see he was happy. Carmen was happy. The whole group was happy, and I was very happy.

    DN: Apart from the World Series titles and attendance records, your tenure may be most associated with hiring Billy Martin five times. Why did you keep going back to him?

    GS: I had affection for him as a manager. He loved to win so much. He just had one weakness – booze. I remember times we had to put him in the shower just to get him ready to go out on the field. (But) he truly had an instinct, a sixth sense on everything. Nobody ever said he wasn't a great manager. It was all the other stuff he was doing.

    DN: There were strong rumors you were going to bring him back a sixth time, before he died on Christmas Day, 1989.

    GS: You never can tell. I did it so many times. Billy had come down to see me a few days before he died. He read a poem at a kids' Christmas concert we put on. He said he was seeing the light. I said, "If you are not careful there's going to be something else that will cause you not to be here." A few days later he was in that crash.

    DN: You are an acknowledged master at keeping the Yankees on the back page. How many of your outbursts and maneuvers were calculated attempts to get publicity for your team?

    GS: The Billy Martin thing at times (was that way). It was done with the idea that this would give importance to hiring him back. The press in New York I don't normally mind what they do, because I realize they've got a job to do. But it is the most searching press in the world. You have five or six newspapers, so it makes it doubly tough. But I also realize it's probably why Sinatra said if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere.

    I have my enemies, my detractors. I have to stay the course. I'm not always comfortable with it, but I'm willing to accept it.

    DN: What do you consider the cheapest shot anyone has taken at you?

    GS: I'm sure a lot of the shots have been very well–deserved.

    DN: For all the flack you get around baseball for buying championships, you seem to be much more targeted in your spending these days than you were, say, 15 or 20 years ago, when you'd sign the Davey Collinses and Ed Whitsons and Doyle Alexanders willy–nilly, with no apparent plan in place. What has changed?

    GS: I attribute it to the organization. Everybody has a place and everyone is accountable.

    DN: Is the organizational soundness why you keep much more homegrown talent than you used to?

    GS: Yes. Now they all don't work out, but a hell of a lot of them have. We take votes on everything we do. We write down which people are in favor of which deals, who to get and who to keep. For instance, Posada, who has turned out to be a pretty fair catcher — he was pushed by the fellas down here and the fellas up there didn't want him. And there's (Alfonso) Soriano. I won't say who, but one coach sat in a meeting down here and said, "He will never play second base for this team. He can't do this and he can't do that."

    DN: Weren't you close to trading Soriano for Jim Edmonds?

    GS: I have to admit I was favoring Edmonds at the time. I never believed Soriano would be as great as he is. Most guys said to keep Soriano (so) I wasn't ready to pull the trigger.

    DN: If you were a GM and you could have your pick of every player you've had in your time with the Yankees, who would be your first–round choice?

    GS: I couldn't pick. I wouldn't want to pick. I will tell you I've had some great warriors – and that's a title of honor for me. Lou Piniella was a great warrior. My right fielder last year (Paul O'Neill) was a great warrior. (Thurman) Munson, Rogers Clemens – I've had some great warriors.

    DN: The Yankees haven't had a captain since Don Mattingly. Do you see Derek Jeter as a strong candidate?

    GS: Joe (Torre) would like that right now, but I don't think now is the right time. I want to see Jetes truly focused. He wasn't totally focused last year. He had the highest number of errors he's had in some time. He wasn't himself.

    As far as trying and being a warrior, I wouldn't put anyone ahead of him. But how much better would he be if he didn't have all his other activities? I tell him this all the time. I say, 'Jetes, you can't be everything to everybody. You've got to focus on what's important.' The charitable things he does are important. A certain amount (of his outside pursuits) are good for him and for the team, but there comes a point when it isn't, and I think we're getting close to that point.

    He makes enough money that he doesn't need a lot of the commercials. I'm not going to stick my nose into his family's business. They are very fine people, (but) if his dad doesn't see that, he should see it. When I read in the paper that he's out until 3 a.m. in New York City going to a birthday party, I won't lie. That doesn't sit well with me. That was in violation of Joe's curfew. That's the focus I'm talking about.

    Jeter's still a young man. He'll be a very good candidate for the captaincy. But he's got to show me and the other players that that's not the right way. He's got to make sure his undivided, unfettered attention is given to baseball. I just wish he'd eliminate some of the less important things and he'd be right back to where he was in the past.

    DN: Your father, by all accounts, was very rough on you, and was even quoted as saying when you bought the Yankees that it was the first smart thing you'd ever done. Is that true?

    GS: It is true. You always try to please your father. I don't care who you are. If I was running a hurdles race and I won three and lost one, he'd say, ‘How come you lost?' That was the thing you should concentrate on. Spend no time concentrating on your victories.

    Concentrate on your defeats, so they don't happen again.

    DN: Is that a healthy thing?

    GS: Sometimes you could say it was asking too much, but that's the way my father was. He was a very tough German.

    DN: You have four grown kids of your own. Have you been as tough on them?

    GS: I probably have. They've all done well. I can't complain about any of my kids. They aren't very selfish. They're very giving, and that's important.

    DN: What really happened in that elevator fight with those two Dodger fans in the '81 Series?

    GS: A lot of people tried to say it was phony and a put–on. You don't put–on what I did to my hand. It still hurts on some days.

    DN: What would you like to accomplish in sports that you haven't yet?

    GS: Probably win a Kentucky Derby. The best I've done is fourth, with Steve's Friend. (My son) Hank is as good at breeding horses as anyone. We've got some pretty good ones in the barn.

    DN: Would you like to see Pete Rose in the Hall of Fame?

    GS: Yes. Pete Rose is a friend of mine. I think he deserves to be in the Hall of Fame. Beyond that, whether he comes back to baseball, Bud Selig has to decide that.

    DN: How much longer do you see yourself involved in the day–to–day operation of the Yankees?

    GS: The old war horse can only keep going so long. As long as I get up in the morning with vigor and the desire to attack, attack, attack, I will try to be involved. But my kids (Hal and Hank, and son–in–law Steven Swindal) are coming along fast.

    DN: Who do think will be running the team in 10 or 15 years?

    GS: I don't know. It's been very good to my family and very good to me and a lot of people close to me, and I think they appreciate it.

    DN: Your old history professor from Williams, Charles Keller, once sent you a postcard of Monet's 'Façade in Sunlight,' and wrote: "So it is in life that we must often step back from things to see them as they really are." What do you see when you step back and view your 30 years with the Yankees?

    GS: Overall, I did my best. If I did make serious mistakes I tried to rectify them. Nobody can tell you that everyday that goes by in their lifetime they don't learn more. As long as you can say you did your best, I guess that's enough.

    I am a driver. I never let up on my guys. We have a pretty damn good organization, and they're all working. We don't take two or three weeks off at Christmas. We work, because they're all gaining on us. They're doing everything they can to gain on us.

    Coming tomorrow: Reflections from those who know The Boss well – for better or worse.

  2. #2
    NYYF Cy Young

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    Man, the Boss just goes out of his way to load everyone gun with ammo....

  3. #3
    When I read in the paper that he's out until 3 a.m. in New York City going to a birthday party, I won't lie. That doesn't sit well with me. That was in violation of Joe's curfew. That's the focus I'm talking about.
    Is there a difference between being at a party until 3 am and playing a game at 7:30 PM, that goes 15 innings, and you play all 15, and ends at 1 AM, which causes you to get home at 3 am (after you talk to the press, shower, etc.)?

    Are not all 3 ams the same?

  4. #4
    The Best Ever ! jnewmark's Avatar
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    Ya know,I tend to agree with the boss about Jeter-he did'nt seem like he had the same intensity or focus last season as in the past. I thought it might have been the departure of Oneil,Brosious,and Tino that got him down,but maybe George is right.Also,I knew it would'nt be long before the Boss replied to Lucchino's comments.Way to go,George!

  5. #5
    Originally posted by Otto Velez


    Is there a difference between being at a party until 3 am and playing a game at 7:30 PM, that goes 15 innings, and you play all 15, and ends at 1 AM, which causes you to get home at 3 am (after you talk to the press, shower, etc.)?

    Are not all 3 ams the same?
    no, they aren't.... being at a party until 3 am usually means drinking... and playing a game until 3 am is what he gets paid for... he doesn't get paid to party..

    jeter is a stand up guy and a doubt that will happen again...

  6. #6
    NYYF MVP


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    I'm surprised he didn't have anything to say about Reggie Jackson or Catfish Hunter. I really never cared about GDP Winfield whom George speaks of. Reggie was just so much better than Winfield.

    Other than that, it was a pretty good article. George sure is candid!
    [B]Rocky Colavito was a colorful ballplayer that I would love to see in the Hall of Fame. He had a rifle of an arm and hit 374 lifetime home runs, none of them with a corked bat, either. He finished his career as a member of the New York Yankees and retired the same year as Mickey Mantle.[/B]

  7. #7
    Hank is my Hero!! yankeegeek's Avatar
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    Very good interview. I agree that Jeter wasn't as focused as he could be. We were missing ledership last season. Jeter has to step up to the plate and take the role.

    I just think the whole interview was intresting as hell.

  8. #8
    Even if you have no respect for George as an owner, you have to respect the fact that he is brutally honest.

  9. #9
    Released Outright
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    I agree with KLJ. Even if jeter isnt out drinking at 3am, the fact is that someone else might be. if one of those drunken idiots decides pick a fight with Jeter and to put a knife in his ribs, then we are out of a shortstop, and Steinbrenner is out 189 million george washingtons. Joe has a curfew for a reason, jeter should obey it. period.

  10. #10
    Finally had to change avatars NYYRules#1's Avatar
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    great article. i agree w/ most of what he said.

  11. #11
    Originally posted by Otto Velez


    Is there a difference between being at a party until 3 am and playing a game at 7:30 PM, that goes 15 innings, and you play all 15, and ends at 1 AM, which causes you to get home at 3 am (after you talk to the press, shower, etc.)?

    Are not all 3 ams the same?
    And no also because you have a choice to leave a party before it's over. You can't just up and leave a baseball game when you're playing short stop.

  12. #12
    Bazinga Hitman23's Avatar
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    I agree with George's statement about Jeter and the commercials. He does make enough money, he has all the exposure he wants without even trying. What's the point? I feel the same about Giambi as well. Neither one of them need it.

    That was a very interesting article. Thanks for posting
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  13. #13
    Released Outright ACPS's Avatar
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    Way to stick it to those Red Sox, George!

  14. #14
    B-B.com Bench Coach patrick.o's Avatar
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    Thanks for the great article/interview. George may have made his share of mistakes, but he always made them with the right intentions in mind. It's always been about making the Yankees the absolute best they could possibly be.

  15. #15
    My History. Your Tradition. JDPNYY's Avatar
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    George is................

    ........................"The Man"


  16. #16
    Let's Go Yankees!!! Bozidar's Avatar
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    Originally posted by JDPNYY
    George is................

    ........................"The Man"

    No doubt.

    I am not looking forward to the day when he actually retires...

  17. #17
    NYYF Legend

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    Re: George speaks out: on Jeter Staying Out Late, Lucchino, Stanton and more...

    Originally posted by b-ball-lunachick


    DN: The agreement doesn't require teams that are receiving money to spend it on players. Did the union drop the ball there?

    GS: Somebody certainly should've seen that.

    [/i]
    What? They didn't read anything on this board?

  18. #18
    B-B.com Bench Coach patrick.o's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Bozidar
    I am not looking forward to the day when he actually retires...
    Me either. The devil you know is better than the one you don't, and I find it hard to believe the whoever succeeds him will have an equal desire to win.

  19. #19
    Originally posted by yankeegeek
    Very good interview. I agree that Jeter wasn't as focused as he could be. We were missing ledership last season. Jeter has to step up to the plate and take the role.

    I just think the whole interview was intresting as hell.
    Ditto. May the boss rule the yankees forever. The Red Sox shots were great .

  20. #20
    Owner of a coconut bra. Yankchic22's Avatar
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    Originally posted by patrick.o

    Me either. The devil you know is better than the one you don't, and I find it hard to believe the whoever succeeds him will have an equal desire to win.
    Its hard to believe that anyone will have the desire that George does.
    Quote Originally Posted by Big_E
    Oh yeah, things are always better when Randi's around.

  21. #21
    Be Smart! Buzah!'s Avatar
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    He owns

    the Yankees and is also their biggest fan. Fewer fans would be bitching if their owner was also a fan.

  22. #22
    Released Outright NyMike's Avatar
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    Originally said by George Stienbrenner
    I will tell you I've had some great warriors – and that's a title of honor for me. Lou Piniella was a great warrior. My right fielder last year (Paul O'Neill) was a great warrior. (Thurman) Munson, Rogers Clemens – I've had some great warriors.
    Heh....Pinella, O'Niell, Munson, and..............Clemens?

    If someone told me 3 or 4 years ago that George would be using these names in the same sentence....I would've laughed.

  23. #23
    NYYF HOF

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    Steinbrenner wants more focus from Jeter, Torre

    http://espn.go.com/mlb/news/2002/1229/1483798.html

    Sunday, December 29

    Steinbrenner wants more focus from Jeter, Torre

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Associated Press

    NEW YORK -- New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner wants Derek Jeter to be more focused.

    Steinbrenner blamed Jeter's declining production on the shortstop's numerous off-field activities and said he's not quite ready to be the team's first captain since Don Mattingly.

    In an interview with the New York Daily News printed in Sunday's editions, Steinbrenner also said he is holding manager Joe Torre and his coaching staff accountable for the team's first-round playoff exit.

    "As far as trying and being a warrior, I wouldn't put anyone ahead of" Jeter, Steinbrenner was quoted as saying. "But how much better would he be if he didn't have all his other activities?

    "I tell him this all the time. I say, 'Jetes, you can't be everything to everybody. You've got to focus on what's important.'

    "When I read in the paper that he's out until 3 a.m. in New York City going to a birthday party, I won't lie. That doesn't sit well with me. That was in violation of Joe's curfew. That's the focus I'm talking about."

    Jeter, a four-time All-Star, hit .297 with 18 homers and 75 RBI last season. He made 14 errors.

    "I want to see Jetes truly focused. He wasn't totally focused last year. He had the highest number of errors he's had in some time," Steinbrenner said. "He wasn't himself."

    Steinbrenner also wants a better performance by Torre and his staff.

    "I just want his coaches to understand that just being a friend of Joe Torre's is not enough," he said. "They've got to produce for him. Joe Torre and his staff have heard the bugle.

    "Joe is the greatest friend I've ever had as a manager. ... I don't want to destroy that, but I will tell you this: I want his whole staff to understand that they have got to do better this year."

    Steinbrenner also said baseball targeted the Yankees in its new Collective bargaining agreement.

    "I am a Bud Selig man. I consider him a good friend. ... But while I'm loyal to Bud Selig, the biggest beneficiary in this whole plan are the Milwaukee Brewers," Steinbrenner said. "That doesn't seem quite right. I don't know how he sleeps at night sometimes."

  24. #24
    Larry Walker's Fanclub Rocketman's Avatar
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    This was the best article I've ever read from a NY sports page.

    Terrific interview.

  25. #25
    I agree with alot of what he said; however, I don't agree with all of it. On the whole it was a good article.

    In my opinion, I don't think I would exchange barbs with the Red Sox president. It is clear to most, that Lucchino was speaking out of anger and clearly seems very childish (not something that looks good for someone running an organization-intelligent people acknowledge when they've been beaten and move on-they don't resort to name calling). There's a saying that goes: Never argue with a fool because listners (or readers in this case) can't tell the difference. I think it would have been classier for Steinbrenner to just acknowledge that he heard the comments and left it at that. Steinbrenner would have looked like the bigger man, now it seems as though he is trying to stoop to their level.

    On Torre:

    I don't like the fact that every time they mention how much Torre is appreciated Steinbrenner has to keep bringing up the past. We are all well aware of the facts, it seems like he is tries to undermined Torre every time. I think Torre was an integral part of the of Yankees winning those championships. There have been many managers who have had great teams and not won. The Yankee organization and Torre have benefited from one another. No one likes to be constantly reminded of their bleak past. I sure Steinbrenner doesn't like being reminded of the 80s. I think people appreciate Torre because he shows class in public. He doesn't try to belittle his players or the owner. He is a real class act.

    On Jeter:

    The birthday party where he supposedly stayed out until 3 am was followed by a day off, so it wasn't like it was a school/work night. They played a night game against the Mets and won, and the birthday party followed that game. It would like you requesting a day off from work and then having your boss telling you what you could or could not do on your day off. Would that be acceptable to you? Your boss pays your salary just like Steinbrenner pays Jeter. I could understand his complaint if they had a practice session the day after the party and he came in unprepared (hung over), I might be wrong but I don't think they had practice the next day. And Steinbrenner was wrong about the errors too, everyone seemed to notice the change (however slight it may have been) in Jeter's defense this year. I remember throughtout the year as Jeter was struggling offensively how he continued to work on your game.

    About the commericals, I think that most of the contracts that Jeter has signed were signed prior to him signing that huge contract with the Yankees. I also think that most of the contracts that he has also benefit his organization (of course, I'm not certain of any of this, just the impression that I got), and how many times have we seen post that have said how glad we are to have him as a Yankee because of his charitable work, along with the effort he puts out on the field.

    Is the captain thing overrated? These are grown men and they should be able to motivate themselves. After all, most of them are fathers and have children that they should be setting an example for (work ethic), I'd be a little worried about any team that needed a captain. I know we all need a little help now and then, but different things motivate different people.

    I agree with him about the CBA and what should and shouldn't have been done, and the nice little insights about his life were a definite plus. It was a good article.

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