+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    NYYF Triple Crown


    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Nassau County

    Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    From an advertisement on another forum I found http://www.fanfreedom.org/wp-content.../SeatGeek1.png and I calculated the average price of 13 tickets with 1 purchased in each listed section (using the average of the highest and lowest value if a price range was given) along with the average resale price. All 13 sections had a majority of resold tickets sold for below face value and 11 sections had an average resale price that was below face value. My results were an average face value price of $105.81 and an average resale value of $83.26, which is 21.3% lower than face value. Note that this is for 1 ticket in each section and ignores the fact that different sections have different numbers of seats.

  2. #2
    NYYF Triple Crown

    StingrayJG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Shelton, CT

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    My old section (229) having 74% sell under face at about an avg. of $14 less

    That sounds like about what I remember. My 2011 FV was $70 and I'd routinely see them in the mid $50's, sometimes less.

    I so don't miss those days.

    Link from the OP:
    Jimmy G. (Seniority 03/28/1994)
    1994-2008: Main Res MVP Sec. 14, Row G
    2009: Section 330, Row 6
    2010: Section 233A, Row 20
    2011: Section 229, Row 16 *All Sunday Plans*
    2012: No longer STH, liberated!

  3. #3

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    What this should tell the Yankees (whom I'm sure couldn't care less) is that the only sections that are even priced remotely in the ballpark (sorry) of their true value is the Grandstand seats as well as the Main level just past the infield.

    Unless 30% or more of the Field & MVP plans cancel, they will make more money keeping the prices exactly where they are, as opposed to lowering them by 30%. This obviously ignores the fact that each person who attends a game will then shell out additional $$$ on concessions and will be one less empty seat to show on TV

    If Levine was really smart (he's obviously not) they would use a large chunk of the luxury tax savings and do some massive price cutting on ticket prices. It will never happen, even if attendance really nosedives in the next couple of years

  4. #4

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Does the Average Ticket Price over/under Face take into account the secondary market commissions for the buyer and seller? For example a $120 ticket selling on Stub Hub for $100 only nets the seller $85 and costs the buyer $110. So I wonder which Average Ticket Price is used in this Seat Geek Chart, $85, $100 or $110?

    Quote Originally Posted by StingrayJG View Post

    Link from the OP:

  5. #5

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by pacersyankees View Post
    What this should tell the Yankees (whom I'm sure couldn't care less) is that the only sections that are even priced remotely in the ballpark (sorry) of their true value is the Grandstand seats as well as the Main level just past the infield.

    Unless 30% or more of the Field & MVP plans cancel, they will make more money keeping the prices exactly where they are, as opposed to lowering them by 30%. This obviously ignores the fact that each person who attends a game will then shell out additional $$$ on concessions and will be one less empty seat to show on TV

    If Levine was really smart (he's obviously not) they would use a large chunk of the luxury tax savings and do some massive price cutting on ticket prices. It will never happen, even if attendance really nosedives in the next couple of years
    Just a thought: it could be that the data shows that fans selecting cheaper ticket options spend less at the ballpark.

  6. #6
    NYYF Legend

    GordonGecko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by pacersyankees View Post
    What this should tell the Yankees (whom I'm sure couldn't care less) is that the only sections that are even priced remotely in the ballpark (sorry) of their true value is the Grandstand seats as well as the Main level just past the infield.
    From experience even the Grandstand are well over priced for most games. Even if you could come close to face on average, you'd have to sell all the good games and end up having to go to Monday nights against the Royals

  7. #7

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    From experience even the Grandstand are well over priced for most games. Even if you could come close to face on average, you'd have to sell all the good games and end up having to go to Monday nights against the Royals
    That was not my experience at all in 2012. I was able to sell all games at least at face value and go to all the good games that I wanted to.

    I only had one game that did not sell, which was a Friday night game in May against the Reds when Pettite was pitching for the second time back at Yankee Stadium which I thought was so friggin' odd, that's why it was so memorable. I wanted to go and couldn't for some reason, so put it up on StubHub late but thought it would sell quickly ... c'est la vie.

    Overall, I did fine selling, went to more games than ever, became a bigger fan, went to games with my daughters (great quality time), they became bigger fans, they went with their friends, we had a great time!

    This year, I plan to attend as many games as last year and my daughters want to attend more than last year. It's going to be a fun summer

    The one thing I did last year and will NOT do this year, is I bought premium games in the STH presale on the Main and Jim Beam sections and thought I could sell them for a profit and that was a struggle to break even. I have a huge note on my computer to remind me NOT to buy tickets in the STH presale this year and I offer that to Forum members as advice to follow. Paying the advance game day price plus Ticketmaster fees makes it impossible to compete with the STHers selling on StubHub, I had to get very creative to sell my STH presale tickets at cost. Plus I bought tickets behind home plate on field level with my 50% off coupons for $150 instead of $300 and I was only able to break even on selling those on StubHub.

  8. #8

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Not spending/wasting the time to back out all of the referenced price levels, relative over/under face levels, etc. But just a simple observation; some of those figures in the initial price range are too high. Stingray's $70 FV as an example. Another being full season face in sections 112 and 113 is 120/ea (aside from the first three rows). Max maybe 175/ea before TM fees for individual games. Price ranges given for other sections may or may not be similarly high; simply some examples. Fairly immaterial; just saying...


    Quote Originally Posted by StingrayJG View Post
    My old section (229) having 74% sell under face at about an avg. of $14 less

    That sounds like about what I remember. My 2011 FV was $70 and I'd routinely see them in the mid $50's, sometimes less.

    I so don't miss those days.

    Link from the OP:

  9. #9

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by NYY_72 View Post
    Not spending/wasting the time to back out all of the referenced price levels, relative over/under face levels, etc. But just a simple observation; some of those figures in the initial price range are too high. Stingray's $70 FV as an example. Another being full season face in sections 112 and 113 is 120/ea (aside from the first three rows). Max maybe 175/ea before TM fees for individual games. Price ranges given for other sections may or may not be similarly high; simply some examples. Fairly immaterial; just saying...
    Looks like Seat Geek used single game advance purchase price for the initial price range, so if a seller is a full or partial STH they paid less. Look at Infield Grandstand, it says $32 and I paid $28
    What is less clear is the resale price. If a ticket was resold at $100 on StubHub, the buyer paid $110 and the seller received $85. So which price is Seat Geek showing as the average ticket price over/under face?

  10. #10

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by YankeeSTH View Post
    Looks like Seat Geek used single game advance purchase price for the initial price range, so if a seller is a full or partial STH they paid less. Look at Infield Grandstand, it says $32 and I paid $28
    What is less clear is the resale price. If a ticket was resold at $100 on StubHub, the buyer paid $110 and the seller received $85. So which price is Seat Geek showing as the average ticket price over/under face?
    Agreed and appreciate your observation/question on the round turn commission costs for buyers and sellers.

    I'm simply looking at, for example, the $200-$275 price range cited for some field level seats. You can get into at least some of those sections at $120/ea for FS, and individual games at $175/ea (maybe up to $190 with TM fees). In any case, direct from the team prices with fees for individual games are lower than their price range. So Seat Geek is starting with higher levels, etc - leading to a bunch of noise. Obviously the correct trend (overpriced relative to market), but it's at least somewhat misleading.

  11. #11

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by NYY_72 View Post
    Agreed and appreciate your observation/question on the round turn commission costs for buyers and sellers.

    I'm simply looking at, for example, the $200-$275 price range cited for some field level seats. You can get into at least some of those sections at $120/ea for FS, and individual games at $175/ea (maybe up to $190 with TM fees). In any case, direct from the team prices with fees for individual games are lower than their price range. So Seat Geek is starting with higher levels, etc - leading to a bunch of noise. Obviously the correct trend (overpriced relative to market), but it's at least somewhat misleading.
    Now that the partial STH online SAS is over, the Yankees put the advance game day and game day prices up on the virtual venue. So, assuming the prices for 2013 are the same as 2012 (I can't find my 2012 price list), Section 112 has split pricing (front and rear) as low as $120/ticket for full season in rear but as high as $200 per ticket for the front advance game day price, the rear rows are $175 advance game day. So, Seat Geek used the $200.

    Anyway, really just wanted to let everyone know the advance game day and game day prices are up on the virtual venue. I'm getting excited for the season to start

  12. #12
    NYYF Legend

    longtimeyankeefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    The eternal state of optimism that the Yankees will win it all

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by pacersyankees View Post
    What this should tell the Yankees (whom I'm sure couldn't care less) is that the only sections that are even priced remotely in the ballpark (sorry) of their true value is the Grandstand seats as well as the Main level just past the infield.

    Unless 30% or more of the Field & MVP plans cancel, they will make more money keeping the prices exactly where they are, as opposed to lowering them by 30%. This obviously ignores the fact that each person who attends a game will then shell out additional $$$ on concessions and will be one less empty seat to show on TV

    If Levine was really smart (he's obviously not) they would use a large chunk of the luxury tax savings and do some massive price cutting on ticket prices. It will never happen, even if attendance really nosedives in the next couple of years
    What this finding tells me is that people should not buy season tickets as an investment attempting to resell the tickets that they don't want to use on the secondary market and expect to make back their investment.

    BTW - how many of you who did, in fact, resell your tickets at a profit (for example, the person who sold me the opening day tickets this year at a decent markup) report those profits to the IRS?
    Forgive me for taking the Contrarian view

  13. #13

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by longtimeyankeefan View Post
    =
    BTW - how many of you who did, in fact, resell your tickets at a profit (for example, the person who sold me the opening day tickets this year at a decent markup) report those profits to the IRS?
    I don't think you're going to get a lot of responses to that question...

  14. #14
    NYYF Legend

    longtimeyankeefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    The eternal state of optimism that the Yankees will win it all

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by Flushing Roots View Post
    I don't think you're going to get a lot of responses to that question...
    Actually, I just read in another thread that StubHub sends IRS Form 1099-Ks to their big sellers, so there is a tax element to this process that I had not considered.

    I guess you can do the "I sold 40 tickets I bought at $40 face value = $1600 cost at $1750 gross less commissions of $250 = loss of $100 dance" for the IRS.
    Forgive me for taking the Contrarian view

  15. #15
    NYYF Legend

    GordonGecko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by longtimeyankeefan View Post
    I guess you can do the "I sold 40 tickets I bought at $40 face value = $1600 cost at $1750 gross less commissions of $250 = loss of $100 dance" for the IRS.
    That's not a game you want to play. And showing losses on schedule C is always a bad idea because that's a common audit flag so if you're going to sell for any kind of volume you better make sure you come out on top. I've always declared my profits but the difference this year is both stubhub and paypal are going to be issuing 1099's. Stubhub I don't care about, but the paypal is going to be a pain because I don't just get ticket revenue from there there's also random ebay types sales and now I'm going to have to deal with that COGS accounting too

  16. #16

    Re: Statistics On Face Value and Resale Price of 2012 Yankees Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    That's not a game you want to play. And showing losses on schedule C is always a bad idea because that's a common audit flag so if you're going to sell for any kind of volume you better make sure you come out on top. I've always declared my profits but the difference this year is both stubhub and paypal are going to be issuing 1099's. Stubhub I don't care about, but the paypal is going to be a pain because I don't just get ticket revenue from there there's also random ebay types sales and now I'm going to have to deal with that COGS accounting too
    You mean this year as starting in 2013 with the SH & PP 1099s?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts