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Bernie51
01-07-06, 09:25 PM
I got invited to a Goldman Sach's networking event on Wednesday (I applied for an internship). What exactly do you do in a networking event?

Archer1979
01-07-06, 09:28 PM
I got invited to a Goldman Sach's networking event on Wednesday (I applied for an internship). What exactly do you do in a networking event?

It's more or less a get-together with various folks (I'm guessing Goldman Sachs executives in your case) to create contacts, put names with faces, etc.

For them, they get to see how you interact socially and size you up.

One very important thing... this is not a party!!! There may be alcohol there but keep your wits about you.

In those types of settings, I drink 7-Up. It looks like a drink and you don't have to worry about saying something that you'll regret.

SoCal Pinstriper
01-07-06, 09:31 PM
I'm a banker here in LA. I go to several each month. They are great opportunities to get to know other people in your industry. At the ones I attend, Specific deals are discussed (and get done as a result), and many of us who would otherwise never meet face to face get a chance to do so.

SoCal Pinstriper
01-07-06, 09:34 PM
One very important thing... this is not a party!!! There may be alcohol there but keep your wits about you.

.90% of the ones I attend are breakfast or lunch, but that is great advice.

Jersey Yankee
01-07-06, 09:35 PM
I got invited to a Goldman Sach's networking event on Wednesday (I applied for an internship). What exactly do you do in a networking event?
I guess that this is a people networking thing, so you'll be meeting quality people. For an internship thing, maybe you'll need a resume, or collect business cards? I'm not into that, so try finding out beforehand.

Dress very appropriately in a nicely tailored business suit or dress, as it's a *HUGE* brokerage firm (John Corzine used to head it), wear very little perfume, and be on your best behavior. Afterwards, you can slug me for lecturing you, but in the end, it may be worth it.

Bernie51
01-07-06, 09:38 PM
What kind of questions should I ask? See the thing is that I never ask questions and I know it's a turnoff for a lot of these companies, or at least that's what the career development center at my school tells me.

Archer1979
01-07-06, 09:49 PM
What kind of questions should I ask? See the thing is that I never ask questions and I know it's a turnoff for a lot of these companies, or at least that's what the career development center at my school tells me.

How do you get around those pesky insider trading laws?


j/k

Try to learn a little about the operation beforehand. If you can get an organizational chart, do it. Ask questions about the various functions of the individual organizations. Ask questions where folks talk about themselves (because people love to talk about themselves). Ask questions of folks that get them interested in helping you (ie So how did you make the jump from dept x to dept y). From there you might not only gain a contact, but possibly a mentor.

Archer1979
01-07-06, 09:50 PM
Dress very appropriately in a nicely tailored business suit or dress, as it's a *HUGE* brokerage firm (John Corzine used to head it), wear very little perfume, and be on your best behavior. Afterwards, you can slug me for lecturing you, but in the end, it may be worth it.

This is important as well. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

NJ Fan
01-07-06, 09:55 PM
What kind of questions should I ask? See the thing is that I never ask questions and I know it's a turnoff for a lot of these companies, or at least that's what the career development center at my school tells me.

These may help... for future reference...

http://www.quintcareers.com/career_fair_questions.html

http://www.pohly.com/interview-2.html

http://www.career.vt.edu/JOBSEARC/interview/AskQues.htm

SoCal Pinstriper
01-07-06, 10:00 PM
What kind of questions should I ask? See the thing is that I never ask questions and I know it's a turnoff for a lot of these companies, or at least that's what the career development center at my school tells me.If you want to work in banking you should read the Wall Street Journal daily (the news coverage and the editorial page as well as the stock quotes). The Journal does a great job of framing the news in a business context.

Being prepared to make intellegent conversation is probably more important than preparing specific questions.

Jersey Yankee
01-07-06, 11:29 PM
What kind of questions should I ask? See the thing is that I never ask questions and I know it's a turnoff for a lot of these companies, or at least that's what the career development center at my school tells me.
RULE #1: Know about the company you're planning to meet at, as well as the industry itself:

http://www.gs.com/ (GS's website)

Bring along a copy of the Wall St Journal *AND* the NY Times, so you at least look like you're going forwards (make sure you read the articles).

Since you're going into the financial industry, pick up Forbes, Money, etc and *STUDY* them.

Learn all that you can from their website, including any "Opportunities"/"Careers" at said firm.

http://www.gs.com/careers/index.html

Make sure you're best behaved, best dressed and look like you're in a business environment. No Sunday or party dresses. Dark suit may help, polished shoes, no bubble gum, etc.

*YES*, I'm lecturing you. If I don't, they'll kindly introduce you to the "... with so many other qualified candidates, this made our decision difficult" letter" type of thing.

*TAKE NOTES* and bring along a very nice pen (the $0.19 Bic pen your Dad bought you doesn't count as nice), and always make sure that you shake hands firmly, remember people's names. If it's "Nanci", remember "Nancy". If it's "Stephen", make sure you know if it's pronounced "Stef-en" or "Steven".

If there's food, don't get the lobster. Just eat a little and don't act like an idiot. If you do, they'll surely remember you, including if someone remembers you from this time.

Don't waste golden opportunities like this!!!

Jersey Yankee
01-07-06, 11:32 PM
Did I mention gettin there on time? If not, then you come late, that'll be counted. Get there on time and act like a civilized human being. You can hit the jello shots and blow bubbles w/gum once you get home.

That nice businesslike hairdo may be worth the money. Clothes that look good and feel good could also be a plus, as are good shoes and a nice coat. Any athletic wear should be avoided. A nice trench coat or something similar would be ideal.

chanman7483
01-08-06, 12:28 PM
This is important as well. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

I might be getting a little ahead of myself(for your situation) but when i interned at Goldman, I noticed a bit of a heiarchy... some unspoken rule where the older more established guys were the only ones who could wear cufflinks, white dress shirts and red ties... all the younger dudes had to stick w/ blue. Just something I noticed. So watch out ;)

Bernie51
01-08-06, 01:06 PM
Damn, all this for a summer internship? Ok I'm scared now. I didn't think it would be this big of a deal.

Also, I didn't think they would be serving alcohol to interns. We're all pretty much underage.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 01:51 PM
I might be getting a little ahead of myself(for your situation) but when i interned at Goldman, I noticed a bit of a heiarchy... some unspoken rule where the older more established guys were the only ones who could wear cufflinks, white dress shirts and red ties... all the younger dudes had to stick w/ blue. Just something I noticed. So watch out ;)
Who wears cufflinks anymore? Are there similar rules for suspenders or bowties?

I always thought that white dress shirts meant corporate. That and yellow ties. :confused:

So the younger ones wore blue shirts? No grey or other colors?

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 01:53 PM
Damn, all this for a summer internship? Ok I'm scared now. I didn't think it would be this big of a deal.

Also, I didn't think they would be serving alcohol to interns. We're all pretty much underage.
Well, just how old are you? Also, consider it a learning experience. Even if you do manage to get it, at least everyone knows who they are, so if it didn't work out, at least you've tried.

Still, be kind and attentive to people there. Maintain corporate appearance, behavior and attitude at all times. Once you step 100 ft away from the building's exit, you're on your own. :)

chanman7483
01-08-06, 02:04 PM
Who wears cufflinks anymore? Are there similar rules for suspenders or bowties?

I always thought that white dress shirts meant corporate. That and yellow ties. :confused:

So the younger ones wore blue shirts? No grey or other colors?

Well, I didn't see many wearing white shirts and red ties... maybe it's just a conservative thing that the older guys do... dunno. I sometimes wear cufflinks at my job... but i do get teased for it, lol.

Blue shirts, grey, yellow, etc.. just not white.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 07:36 PM
Well, I didn't see many wearing white shirts and red ties... maybe it's just a conservative thing that the older guys do... dunno. I sometimes wear cufflinks at my job... but i do get teased for it, lol.

Blue shirts, grey, yellow, etc.. just not white.
OK, so do the more moneyed guys there--the partners and other movers and shakers--what was their dress mode? 3-piece suits? Those little brass mini-chains between the buttons of the vest? Wingtips? What were they expected to wear that signified their standing on the hierarchy that the newbies were advised not to wear?

chanman7483
01-08-06, 09:45 PM
OK, so do the more moneyed guys there--the partners and other movers and shakers--what was their dress mode? 3-piece suits? Those little brass mini-chains between the buttons of the vest? Wingtips? What were they expected to wear that signified their standing on the hierarchy that the newbies were advised not to wear?

No 3 piece suits.. the only thing i knew of was the white shirt thing. Young guys could be more 'fashionable' vs the 'conservative' dress of the movers/shakers

Dooley Womack
01-08-06, 09:59 PM
Excellent advice by all. Remember, don't be a wallflower, or appear antsy, like you want to get the heck out of there. Let your presence be known through assertiveness, not aggressiveness. Ask questions and show interest in their response, even if you have to feign it....make eye contact. Show that you're a good listener and try not to speak out of turn.

And most importantly, relax; have fun with it. It's not life or death. Good luck.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 10:15 PM
No 3 piece suits.. the only thing i knew of was the white shirt thing. Young guys could be more 'fashionable' vs the 'conservative' dress of the movers/shakers
I remember when I'd worked on Wall St somewhere in the 1980s (at some low-level spot), I saw guys wearing 3-piece suits. I wasn't sure if that was still being worn.

From what I remember, the older guys wore the "Barney's" types of suits w/the pinstripes, and these all looked pretty expensive. The old-school banker's thing. I have no idea where the red ties came from, as I always thought it was yellow. Then again, I rarely wear my 6-10 ties anyway, so what would I know?

I could see the younger crowd, instead of shopping at Burberry's or Saks, shopping at Macy's and picking up a less conservative Perry Ellis suit or something.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 10:17 PM
Excellent advice by all. Remember, don't be a wallflower, or appear antsy, like you want to get the heck out of there. Let your presence be known through assertiveness, not aggressiveness. Ask questions and show interest in their response, even if you have to feign it....make eye contact. Show that you're a good listener and try not to speak out of turn.

And most importantly, relax; have fun with it. It's not life or death. Good luck.
The only problem I have with this whole thing is that she's being intro'd to networking at some humongous brokerage firm. Meanwhile, along lower Broadway, there are many smaller financial firms that could have an internship. It's like being a co-pilot, and your first flight is on a 747. Lotsa fun. :eek:

Dooley Womack
01-08-06, 10:21 PM
The only problem I have with this whole thing is that she's being intro'd to networking at some humongous brokerage firm. Meanwhile, along lower Broadway, there are many smaller financial firms that could have an internship. It's like being a co-pilot, and your first flight is on a 747. Lotsa fun. :eek:

Yeah, I know, what I said is easier said than done, but hopefully, if taken in perspective, it's won't be so overwhelming to the point of clamming up (not that I suspect Bernie51, who seems to have a good personality, will do that). But, yeah, I hear ya. DEEEP breaths, then exhale slooowly.

I think learning to be a good listener is instrumental and the more you absorb (and the more you're prepared, as you and others are stressing) the more you'll eventually feel confident enough to participate and volunteer some input. It's a good tool to carry no matter where life takes you.

chanman7483
01-08-06, 10:46 PM
Excellent advice by all. Remember, don't be a wallflower, or appear antsy, like you want to get the heck out of there. Let your presence be known through assertiveness, not aggressiveness. Ask questions and show interest in their response, even if you have to feign it....make eye contact. Show that you're a good listener and try not to speak out of turn.

And most importantly, relax; have fun with it. It's not life or death. Good luck.

Don't try to sound too serious... like Dooley said, relax. Don't pretend to be something you're not b/c if you have to pretend to get a job, why bother?

Archer1979
01-08-06, 11:07 PM
And don't feel self-conscious about the way you walk.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 11:11 PM
And don't feel self-conscious about the way you walk.
Quick, there's a big grasshopper on your left shoulder.

Now let's see you act like it's not there. It's impossible not to feel self-conscious about one's body movements if someone asks you to. Kinda like these "don't react when I tell you this ..." things, but the person reacts anyway.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 11:14 PM
Yeah, I know, what I said is easier said than done, but hopefully, if taken in perspective, it's won't be so overwhelming to the point of clamming up (not that I suspect Bernie51, who seems to have a good personality, will do that). But, yeah, I hear ya. DEEEP breaths, then exhale slooowly.

I think learning to be a good listener is instrumental and the more you absorb (and the more you're prepared, as you and others are stressing) the more you'll eventually feel confident enough to participate and volunteer some input. It's a good tool to carry no matter where life takes you.
Aren't they by 125 Broad St or something? That's a pretty big building, and I think it's all theirs.

Someone would likely learn more from a much smaller place, as well as having a greater chance of advancing, at a much smaller place. There are capital investments firms close to the NYSE. I mean, if I wanted to build cars, I wouldn't show up at GM. I'd show up at a much smaller factory that had fewer people ahead of me.

Archer1979
01-08-06, 11:18 PM
Quick, there's a big grasshopper on your left shoulder.

Now let's see you act like it's not there. It's impossible not to feel self-conscious about one's body movements if someone asks you to. Kinda like these "don't react when I tell you this ..." things, but the person reacts anyway.

When my current manager got hired, he wanted to meet with our major client. This client had it going for her. She was hot, dressed to the nines, and was perfectly made up. And I knew my boss was a bit of a hound.

So, he asks me if there's anything he needs to know before his first meeting with her.

I told him, "Nothing much, other than she has a glass eye and she doesn't like it when people stare at it."

Apparently they never made eye-contact the whole meeting.

Jersey Yankee
01-08-06, 11:33 PM
When my current manager got hired, he wanted to meet with our major client. This client had it going for her. She was hot, dressed to the nines, and was perfectly made up. And I knew my boss was a bit of a hound.

So, he asks me if there's anything he needs to know before his first meeting with her.

I told him, "Nothing much, other than she has a glass eye and she doesn't like it when people stare at it."

Apparently they never made eye-contact the whole meeting.
Can't be a manager and a hound dog. Sexual harassment will get you canned. If not, the company could get sued if the management doesn't do anything about it. Moreso if a manager is involved.

I once did work at a firm and a *NAME PARTNER* tried dilly-dallying with one of the employees whose firm had just merged with theirs. The just-bought firm's people were so outraged, they forced him to both accept a compensation package, the royal boot, and having his name stricken from the firm.

Other than the rudeness of not looking your client in the eye, you likely did your boss a favor. If he can't control himself with a female client, then losing that client's business, as well as his being subsequently fired would force his hand ... and force him to figure out how to pay his bills.

Long story.

Jersey Yankee
01-09-06, 05:58 PM
some unspoken rule where the older more established guys were the only ones who could wear cufflinks, white dress shirts and red ties... all the younger dudes had to stick w/ blue.
I'm looking at this pic and noticed that our Commander-in-Chief and a USSC nominee are both wearing the red tie thing:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/01/09/national/09alito.jpg

Bernie51
01-09-06, 09:59 PM
If there's one thing I'm really good at, it's listening. I don't have to be told twice and because of my amazing listening (not to float my own boat or anything) skills, I tend to be an incredibly fast learner. The reason why I'm good at this stuff is because when I'm training people at the job I work at, one of my biggest pet peeves is being interrupted by the trainee while I'm explaining something. It's like "hello! I worked here longer than you. I'm trying to explain how to do x and y. Let me freakking finish before you bombard with another question!" I know how rude it can be so I can't even imagine myself doing it to someone else.

Gah! I'm freakking nervous. However, if I don't get this internship, I probably won't be sulking for long. Sachs is not a company that's high on my list but it sure as hell wouldn't hurt to work there for the summer.

chanman7483
01-10-06, 11:49 AM
I'm looking at this pic and noticed that our Commander-in-Chief and a USSC nominee are both wearing the red tie thing:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/01/09/national/09alito.jpg

Red is what's good.

You better watch out when I wear my red tie... I call it my power tie :eek:

Jersey Yankee
01-10-06, 06:17 PM
If there's one thing I'm really good at, it's listening. I don't have to be told twice and because of my amazing listening (not to float my own boat or anything) skills, I tend to be an incredibly fast learner. The reason why I'm good at this stuff is because when I'm training people at the job I work at, one of my biggest pet peeves is being interrupted by the trainee while I'm explaining something. It's like "hello! I worked here longer than you. I'm trying to explain how to do x and y. Let me freakking finish before you bombard with another question!" I know how rude it can be so I can't even imagine myself doing it to someone else.

Gah! I'm freakking nervous. However, if I don't get this internship, I probably won't be sulking for long. Sachs is not a company that's high on my list but it sure as hell wouldn't hurt to work there for the summer.
If you do not sneak in that "Oh, I'm also a corporate trainer in ____", then I'll personally leap outta my computah, into yours and *IN YO' FACE*.

Now then, you'll mention your experience as a corporate trainer, right? Life as you know it may depend upon this. :D

Jersey Yankee
01-10-06, 06:17 PM
Red is what's good.

You better watch out when I wear my red tie... I call it my power tie :eek:
*snatches cm's red tie, dies in blue* :D