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brbyank
05-29-01, 06:57 PM
Did the yankees sign Henn? Yesterday was the dead line to do so, I think.

yogibuck
05-30-01, 08:44 AM
http://www.baseballamerica.com/online/draft/handicap.html

Top Junior College Prospects: Draft & Follow Update
May 29, 2001

Lefthander Sean Henn, a 26th-round pick of the Yankees in the 2000 draft, signed late last week for a reported $1.7 million, the largest bonus ever for a draft-and-follow.

Henn, a sophomore at McLennan (Texas) Junior College, would have been a likely first-round pick in this year's draft had he not signed with the Yankees prior to May 29, the beginning of the close period. No player from the 2000 draft who was still eligible this spring to sign could do so after that date.

Henn's bonus breaks the record set by Cypress (Calif.) JC catcher Gerald Laird, a second-round pick of the Athletics in 1998 who signed the following spring for $1 million.

In addition to Henn, every top-ranked junior college player that was under control from 2000 and identified by Baseball America as a potential early-round selection if he had re-entered this year's draft signed before the start of the close period.

Junior college players are traditionally the toughest group of prospects to assess for the draft. A handful surface as early-round projections each year, but most of those players remove themselves from the draft altogether by signing with the teams that drafted them the previous year as draft-and-follows.

Clubs have 51 weeks to sign players who attend junior college. If a player doesn’t sign before the closed period begins a week before the draft, he goes back into the draft pool. About 60 or 70 draft-and-follows are signed each year.

Here’s this year’s top juco talent, with the teams that control the players’ rights until the closed period.

Rank Player, Pos., School Signed (Round Drafted)
1. Sean Henn, lhp, McLennan (Texas) JC Yankees (26)
2. Jose Bautista, 3b, Chipola (Fla.) JC Pirates (20)
3. Ryan Wing, lhp, Riverside (Calif.) CC None
4. Scott Hairston, 2b, Central Arizona JC None
5. Jake Woods, lhp, Bakersfield (Calif.) JC None
6. Jon Asahina, rhp, Fresno CC Marlins (31)
7. Jared Hemus, lhp, Grossmont (Calif.) JC None
8. Kyle Roat, c, Connors State (Okla.) JC Braves (20)
9. Kurt Birkins, lhp, Los Angeles Pierce JC Orioles (33)
10. Jonathan Van Every, of, Itawamba (Miss.) JC Indians (29)
11. Mark Perkins, rhp, Lake City (Fla.) CC Blue Jays (18)
12. Zach Parker, lhp, San Jacinto (Texas) JC Rockies (21)

CaptainCargo
05-30-01, 11:42 AM
Nice to see we got the kid. Somebody in the Yankees organization obviously has a good eye for young talent.

Take a look at that list carefully and it'll prove my pet assertion.

Namely: Pitching wins World Championships.

Six out of the top ten and eight of the top twelve are pitchers. Assuming essentially four basic positions(pitcher,catcher, IF, OF)
Then sixty percent of the top ten are pitchers. Divided equally the law of averages would say that number should be around 25%. Now maybe none of these guys will ever amount to anything but the "rating" system that ranks them obviously places a higher value on pitching. Why??

Because pitching is the most valuable "singular" commodity to a team.

Yes?? No??



Casey

Elfdood
05-30-01, 04:39 PM
Originally posted by CaptainCargo
Pitching wins World Championships.

Six out of the top ten and eight of the top twelve are pitchers. Assuming essentially four basic positions(pitcher,catcher, IF, OF)
Then sixty percent of the top ten are pitchers. Divided equally the law of averages would say that number should be around 25%. Now maybe none of these guys will ever amount to anything but the "rating" system that ranks them obviously places a higher value on pitching. Why??

Because pitching is the most valuable "singular" commodity to a team.

Yes?? No??Sorta. :)

Pitching and hitting <i>both</i> win World Championships. They're about equally important, statistically.

A normal major league roster has eleven pitchers, which makes it 44% pitchers. The reason for the disparity - 60% of the top draft picks being pitchers - is that young pitchers get hurt. A <i>lot</i>. Most teams draft pitchers assuming they'll get hurt, so they stockpile them, knowing that they'll have a good reserve should some prospects go down.

CaptainCargo
05-31-01, 11:03 AM
Elfy: Okay, so clubs stockpile pitchers. But why are they "ranked" ahead of the rest? They can still be stockpiled without the higher rankings. So why?

Answer: Because pitching is the single most important commodity in baseball. Thus a higher value is placed on them. This is why I say pitching wins championships. I know its something that can't really be proven but what can I say. I'm stubborn. :):)


Casey